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Which is Sexier, Twitter or Facebook?

Jutta Klee | Getty Images

What does a sexy person do—Tweet or Facebook? (Yes, I think we can now use “facebook” as a verb.)

According to AdWeek, people who use Twitter consider themselves sexier than those who use Facebook, based on a surveyin the U.S. by global ad agency Euro RSCG.

"Though most people who use Twitter probably also use Facebook," writes AdWeek, "let's ignore that and look at the intriguing infographic."

The infographic posted on its site explicitly shows the differences between the two groups. Who thinks they're sexy?

Forty percent of those using Twitter do, versus 28 percent of those using Facebook, which means most people on both don't think they're sexy. Who's more sexually "adventurous"? Twitter, 42 percent. Facebook, 33 percent. Thirty-three percent of Tweeters consider themselves skilled lovers, compared to 28 percent on Facebook. Yet again, no group is breaking the 50 percent mark, meaning most people using either online service feel sexually inadequate. Hmmm, I'm starting to wonder if there's a connection to being unsexy and being online. This does not bode well for me.

The survey also asks whether people have flirted online or find sexual thoughts interfere with work, plus a couple really personal questions. Each time, more Twitter users say "yes" than Facebook users do. Why? Well, there's no breakdown in gender, but my own personal observation is that more women use Facebook, more men use Twitter. Men tend to perceive themselves as awesome. Women, not so much.

Do these 140 characters make me look fat?

"WHAT IS THE INTERNET, ANYWAY?"

One final Friday funny. My, how things have changed. If you told me in 1994 that people would be chatting with each other on social networking sites from smartphones, I would have glared at you like you were offering me shares in Pets.com. Here's a hilarious clip from The Today Show from 18 years ago, as Bryant Gumbel and Katie Couric try to figure out what the “@” symbol means. Imagine, a child born the day of this broadcast would be an adult this year. A long time ago, and yet, not really.


Questions? Comments? Funny Stories? Email funnybusiness@cnbc.com

  • Based in Los Angeles, Jane Wells is a CNBC business news reporter and also writes the Funny Business blog for CNBC.com.

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