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CNBC Webinar: How to Harness the Digital Revolution

CNBC.com
Monday, 9 Apr 2012 | 1:33 PM ET
Better Your Business
Better Your Business

The digital revolution is helping to connect the nation's small businesses with corporate America.

Many small businesses don't realize they can expand their market, and their profits, by using digital tools.

In our CNBC online webinar How to Harness the Digital Revolution, Rutgers Business School's Kevin Lyons showed you practical steps you can take now to use technology to connect to large corporation contract and business opportunities.

CNBC's Tyler Mathisen hosted our free 45-minute webinar on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 at 11a ET.

DOWNLOAD THE PRESENTATION SLIDES

Missed our previous webinar? You can see a replay of Going Green Without Going Brokeand download the presentation slides.

About Our Presenter

Kevin Lyons
Kevin Lyons

Kevin Lyons is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Supply Chain Management & Marketing Sciences at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick, New Jersey.

The school's supply chain undergraduate program tied for second, and its graduate program tied for third, is a 2011 ranking by Gartner Supply Chain Leaders.

Education: Ph.D., University of Sunderland; Supply Chain Management and Environmental Management and Policy.

Research Affiliations:

Rutgers Center for Supply Chain Management - Supply Chain Environmental Archeology Lab (http://www.business.rutgers.edu/cscm)

Rutgers EcoComplex (http://ecocomplex.rutgers.edu)

Rutgers Energy Institute (http://rei.rutgers.edu)

Rutgers Center for Sustainable Materials (http://sustain.rutgers.edu)

Rutgers Green Purchasing Program (http://greenpurchasing.rutgers.edu)

Research Interests: Supply chain management, supply chain environment archaeology, supply chain environmental management, systems-thinking process modeling, life-cycle assessment and costing modeling.

Bio: Dr. Lyons conducts research on developing and integrating global environmental, social, economic, ethical criteria and data into supply chain/procurement systems and processes. His research work includes the environmental and economic impacts on raw material extraction, logistics, manufacturing, consumption, consumer of multiple products and services research, designing and implementing local, national and international environmental economic development systems, waste-to-energy systems and environmental and sustainable social policy and financial impact forecasting (e.g. Sarbanes Oxley Corporate Social and Environmental Impact Reporting). He has also created the supply chain archeology and supply chain waste archeology research disciplines and has researched and written extensively on conducting environmental health-checks on global supply chains and the resulting benefits of reduced risk management impacts and costs.

Awards: Sierra Club Annual Professional of the Year Award, New Jersey State Governor's Award for Environmental Leadership and Excellence, NSF-IGERT grants (2).

Better Your Business

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