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Stocks to Watch: AAPL, WMT, S & More

Take a look at some of Wednesday’s morning movers:

Apple - Apple reported fiscal second-quarter profit of $12.30 per share, smashing estimates of $10.04. Revenue also scored a solid beat at $39.2 billion versus estimates of $36.8 billion. The results were driven, not surprisingly, by strong demand for iPhones and iPads.

Wal-Mart Stores - The retailer's shares have been downgraded to "hold" from "buy" at Argus Research, which notes the uncertainty surrounding the company's Mexico bribery investigation.

Caterpillar - The construction equipment maker earned $2.37 per share for the first quarter, versus estimates of $2.13, but revenue was short of estimates at $15.98 billion. Caterpillar did raise its yearly earnings per share outlook to $9.50 versus its prior guidance of $9.25.

Boeing - The jet maker earned $1.22 per share for the first quarter, well above estimates of $0.94. Its results were helped by an increase in commercial airplane deliveries.

Harley-Davidson - The motorcycle maker reported first-quarter profit of $0.74 per share, two cents above estimates, with sales well above Wall Street estimates. It also says it will ship more motorcycles this year than it had forecast in January.

General Dynamics - The defense contractor earned $1.57 per share for the first quarter, short of estimates of $1.69. Its revenues also came up short of forecasts, with a slower pace of government contract awards among the factors.

Sprint Nextel - The mobile phone operator reported a smaller-than-expected loss of 29 cents per share, versus estimates of a $0.41 per share loss. Revenues were above expectations on better-than-expected subscriber growth.

Wellpoint Health - The health insurer reported a first-quarter profit of $2.34 per share, excluding certain items, above estimates of $2.27. It raised its earnings forecast for the year, despite rising benefit expenses.

Eli Lilly - The drug maker earned $0.92 per share, excluding certain items, for the first quarter, beating estimates of $0.78. Revenues also surpassed consensus forecasts, helped by strong sales of Lilly's antidepressant Cymbalta.

Amgen - The biotech company reported first-quarter profit of $1.61 per share, beating Street estimates of $1.45. Revenue also came in above consensus, while the biotech company left its yearly profit forecast unchanged. Sales of the cancer drug Xgeva rose 14 percent, but fell short of forecasts, though Amgen’s Neupogen, Neulasta, and Enbrel drugs saw sales that beat estimates.

Norfolk Southern - The railroad operator reported first-quarter profit of $1.23 per share, 11 cents above estimates. Norfolk saw lower coal shipping revenue, but general merchandise and intermodal shipping gained ground.

Aflac - The insurance company beat Street estimates by 11 cents with its first quarter profit of $1.74 per share, with the insurer posting better-than-expected results and boosting its outlook for its Japanese operation, which provides Aflac’s largest revenue stream.

Credit Suisse - The bank posted a small first-quarter profit that was slightly ahead of estimates, helped by cost cuts and a better than expected showing by its fixed income unit.

Baidu - The Chinese Internet search firm issued a disappointing second-quarter revenue forecast. Though its first-quarter results were in line with estimates, the midpoint of the Chinese Internet search firm’s second-quarter revenue forecast is $857 million, short of the $863 million consensus forecast.

Nasdaq OMX - The exchange operator reported quarterly profit of $0.61 per share, two cents short of estimates. It also announced its first-ever dividend of 13 cents per share, giving it a yield of 2.05 percent.

Iconix - The footwear maker reported quarterly profit of $0.43 per share, two cents short of estimates, with revenues also falling well short of forecasts. Iconix is cutting its full-year outlook due to weakness in its men's brands.

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  • Patti Domm

    Patti Domm is CNBC Executive Editor, News, responsible for news coverage of the markets and economy.

  • A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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  • JeeYeon Park is a writer for CNBC.com. Follow her on Twitter: @JeeYeonParkCNBC

  • Rick Santelli joined CNBC Business News as an on-air editor in 1999, reporting live from the floor of the Chicago Board of Trade.

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