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CNBC Webinar: Competitive-Edge Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing

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Emerging technologies are giving small businesses new tools to improve quality while cutting costs.

In our CNBC online webinar "Competitive-Edge Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing," Rutgers Business School's Kevin Lyons shows you how to use those tools to become more competitive in the constantly evolving global marketplace.

CNBC's Tyler Mathisen hosted our live, 38-minute webinar recorded on Tuesday, June 5, 2012 at 2:30 pm ET.

DOWNLOAD THE PRESENTATION SLIDES

Missed our previous webinars? You can download the slides and see replays of Going Green Without Going Broke,How to Harness the Digital Revolution, and Reduce Costs with Alternative Energy.

About Our Presenter

Kevin Lyons
Kevin Lyons

Kevin Lyons is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Supply Chain Management & Marketing Sciences at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick, New Jersey.

The school's supply chain undergraduate program tied for second, and its graduate program tied for third, is a 2011 ranking by Gartner Supply Chain Leaders.

Education: Ph.D., University of Sunderland; Supply Chain Management and Environmental Management and Policy.

Research Affiliations:

Rutgers Center for Supply Chain Management - Supply Chain Environmental Archeology Lab (http://www.business.rutgers.edu/cscm)

Rutgers EcoComplex (http://ecocomplex.rutgers.edu)

Rutgers Energy Institute (http://rei.rutgers.edu)

Rutgers Center for Sustainable Materials (http://sustain.rutgers.edu)

Rutgers Green Purchasing Program (http://greenpurchasing.rutgers.edu)

Research Interests: Supply chain management, supply chain environment archaeology, supply chain environmental management, systems-thinking process modeling, life-cycle assessment and costing modeling.

Bio: Dr. Lyons conducts research on developing and integrating global environmental, social, economic, ethical criteria and data into supply chain/procurement systems and processes. His research work includes the environmental and economic impacts on raw material extraction, logistics, manufacturing, consumption, consumer of multiple products and services research, designing and implementing local, national and international environmental economic development systems, waste-to-energy systems and environmental and sustainable social policy and financial impact forecasting (e.g. Sarbanes Oxley Corporate Social and Environmental Impact Reporting). He has also created the supply chain archeology and supply chain waste archeology research disciplines and has researched and written extensively on conducting environmental health-checks on global supply chains and the resulting benefits of reduced risk management impacts and costs.

Awards: Sierra Club Annual Professional of the Year Award, New Jersey State Governor's Award for Environmental Leadership and Excellence, NSF-IGERT grants (2).

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