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What Do You Think of Senior Neighborhoods in Town?

When it comes to senior communities, traditional options have included giant, resort-like gated communities. They're chock full of golf courses and dining halls, and often tucked deep in the suburbs.

Reggie Jackson in the 1977 World Series.
Reggie Jackson in the 1977 World Series.

But more seniors including baby boomers are shying away from such communities and opting instead for smaller-scale, age-restricted housing.

These new senior neighborhoods are decidedly low key. And instead of gated living far from the center of the action, they are conveniently located near main streets and town centers with easy access to restaurants, shops and other amenities.

These communities also can be more affordable than nearby homes beyond the age-restricted streets. Monthly maintenance fees are negligible compared to condominium charges.

What about you? Have you considered a centrally located senior neighborhood for yourself or a loved one?

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