GO
Loading...

He Did WHAT? Outrageous Holiday Party Behavior

Merce Bellera | E+ | Getty Images

No matter how many times people tell you not to drink too much and photocopy your butt at the office holiday party, some people just won't listen.

Here are some of the most outrageous things people have done at office parties, according to a survey of marketing and advertising executives by staffing firm The Creative Group:

"An employee threw his coworker in a lagoon!"

"A person rode naked on a ferris wheel."

"An employee dressed up as a wrestler."

"All the bosses wore boxer briefs."

"An employee brought a cocker spaniel to a work event — and the dog relieved himself by the refreshments."

"One coworker came to a Christmas party with a bag of Tupperware so she could pack up all the leftovers."

"A person left an event wearing someone else's shoes."

"An employee shattered a glass table."

"An employee broke his leg climbing a wall."

"My coworkers were competing on the dance floor to see who could do the best moves. It turned into a fight and they both were let go for inappropriate behavior."

Of course, you and I would never do such things but still, it's worth going over a few ground rules.

Here are a few tips from The Creative Group for ensuring that the lagoon or naked ferris wheel story that's now become legend around the office isn't about you!

  • Consider your "plus one" carefully. If it's employees-only — stick to it. And if you can't trust your "plus one" to not shatter a table or break his leg climbing a wall – go solo.
  • Ditch the Santa suit. It's OK to be festive, but don't wear anything too outrageous or revealing.
  • Avoid sharing TMI. It's natural to let your guard down during casual get-togethers, but save that skinny-dipping accident story for your close friends – not co-workers!
  • Don't play paparazzi. Seriously. Someone at this party is going to embarrass himself – don't be the guy that posts it on Facebook, OK?

Of course, don't drink too much — to be on the safe side, limit it to two drinks. Come up with a few talking points ahead of time so you don't wind up going down that TMI road and wondering how to wrap up that skinny-dipping story with a shred of dignity intact. Be an actively-engaged listener. And have a few questions at the ready in case there's a lull. This will also help avoid a sharp turn down skinny-dip road. And be positive! Talking about how much the company or your life sucks may be less risqué than photocopying your butt — but it's still going to leave a mark.

Oh, and I shouldn't have to tell you this, but don't take ho, ho, ho, literally, OK?

Happy holidays!

Email us at ponyblog@cnbc.com or drop a line in the comment box below.

More from The Pony Blog: ponyblog.cnbc.com

Contact Pony Blog

  • Cindy Perman is a writer at CNBC.com, covering jobs, real estate, retirement and personal finance.

  • Based in Los Angeles, Jane Wells is a CNBC business news reporter and also writes the Funny Business blog for CNBC.com.

Humor