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  • Orlando, Florida

    These sunshine cities have focused their efforts on developing new industry niches to strengthen their local economies and promote future growth.

  • Miami at night

    The ebbing economic tide from the Great Recession revealed some of the worst swindles in municipal finance in decades.

  • Detroit city grate is missing a cover. With cut backs to city services, Detroit's infrastructure has fallen into disrepair.

    Detroit's bankruptcy, and rumblings about tax overhaul, have fueled a big sell off in the municipal bond market. What's next?

  • Home of Charles Lang Freer, Detroit railroad car manufacturer.

    Visit any American city and it doesn't take a whole lot of imagination to see where its greatness came from—however faded it may seem to be.

  • On the waterfront: Market Street Bridge and the Tennessee Aquarium

    Chattanooga has made a comeback over the last 5 years thanks to investing in high-speed broadband. In the process, it has wooed $4 billion in foreign investment.

  • View of downtown Oakland, California.

    Interest rate swaps - sold as a way to save money on public financing - have turned into municipal bombs.

  • Lawrence Payne walks past two abandoned houses on September 4, 2013 in the Six Mile Gratiot neighborhood of Detroit, Michigan.

    The head of the National Urban League outlines a plan to close the economic divide that's crippling U.S. cities.

  • Steven A. Cohen

    SAC Capital Advisors will shut down its London office by the end of the year as the hedge fund downsizes, according to a memo sent to staff on Tuesday.

  • New York and Illinois court rulings on 'Amazon taxes' may head to the U.S. Supreme Court to settle questions about the taxing online retail sales.

  • Social Security checks

    Millions of recipients, disabled veterans and federal retirees can expect historically small increases in their benefits come January.

  • Bigfoot?!

    Big data has been used for a variety of things, but its latest use might be its most strange yet: The hunt for Bigfoot.

  • Santelli Exchange: Pension cloud looms in IL

    Gov. Patrick Quinn (D-IL) joins CNBC's Rick Santelli to discuss pension reform in Illinois as lawmakers struggle to come up with a plan.

  • Local specialty bakery saved by investor

    With one foot out the door, Rose’s Wheat Free Bakery and Café in Chicago was saved by Marcus Lemonis, a serial entrepreneur who took a chance on the niche business.

  • Goldman Sachs experienced a trading glitch that caused a huge batch of erroneous trades Tuesday. Many may be canceled but the snafu could still cost Goldman upwards of $100 million.

  • Shale beating expectations

    People in Illinois do not know how much their health care will cost come October 1, and reports say energy production from fracking is rising even faster than experts predicted. Blake Zeff, Salon.com, and Republican strategist Noelle Nikpour, discuss. Also, is a law to protect children of celebrities a waste of time?

  • Man performs coffin-escaping skydive

    Anthony Martin, who's 47-years old, was handcuffed, locked inside a casket, then thrown out of a plane. CNBC's Tyler Mathisen reports he was able to unlock the casket, open his parachute and land safely.

  • New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie

    New Jersey’s standing in America's Top States for Business has declined since Gov. Chris Christie took office in 2010. It finishes 42nd this year.

  • Chicago, Illinois

    New Hampshire, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and California fill out the list with the biggest drops in our America's Top States for Business rankings for 2013.

  • Chicago, Illinois

    New Hampshire, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and California fill out the list with the biggest drops in our America's Top States for Business rankings for 2013.

  • A worker makes denim jeans in Michigan.

    Unions say right-to-work laws infringe on workers’ collective bargaining rights, and proponents call for a federal law as opposed to the current patchwork of state statutes.