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Economic Measures Inflation

  • Recovery sign

    The world economy needs a second stimulus if it is to avoid the fate of Japan in the 1990s when it was stuck with years of sluggish growth, Nobel laureate and professor of economics Paul Krugman told CNBC.

  • Some of the nation's top economic forecasters have gathered for their annual pow-wow in the woods of Maine to compare notes and reflect on the state of the economy.

  • Although the U.S. economy is losing jobs at a slower rate, unemployment could still exceed 10 percent, said Tig Gilliam, CEO of staffing company Adecco North America.

  • The worst buys of the past few years, such as real estate and stocks, may prove to be the best investments a few years from now, said David Dreman, chairman and CIO of Dreman Value Management.

  • diploma_money.jpg

    According to recently released reports from the College Board, most students and their families can expect to pay, on average, from $108 to $1,398 more than what they paid in 2008 for this year's tuition and fees, depending on the type of college.  And with inflation rates continuing to increase, these costs will likely double and even triple in the years to come.  Although these costs are quite daunting, there are ways that parents and kids can prepare themselves for the sticker shock of attending college. 

  • Secretary/Intern

    Employment compensation for U.S. workers has grown over the past 12 months by the lowest amount on record, reflecting the severe recession that has gripped the country.

  • traffic1.jpg

    Tens of thousands of unsafe or decaying bridges carrying 100 million drivers a day must wait for repairs because states are spending stimulus money on spans that are already in good shape or on easier projects like repaving roads, an Associated Press analysis shows.

  • Car Factory Employees

    Friday's GDP report is expected to show the economy shrank further in the second quarter, but many economists believe the recession has finally hit bottom.

  • Looking for a good brawl. Just head over to Wall Street and start talking Fed exit strategy.

  • oilbarrels_money2.jpg

    Curbs on speculation in oil probably would decrease volatility but push prices lower only in the short term, energy trading experts say.

  • Mohamed El-Erian, co-chief executive officer of Pacific Investment Management Co.

    The stock market spent July on a "sugar high," rising to levels not justified by an economy that is still limping along, Pimco's Mohamed El-Erian told CNBC.

  • California Gov. Arnold Schwartzenegger

    Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Tuesday is expected to use his line-item veto power to make additional cuts to California's latest spending plan—a move advocates fear could further hurt the poor.

  • Right now, investors should be concerned about stagflation and not inflation, said Carrie Coghill Kuntz, president and co-founder of D.B. Root & Company.

  • Ben Bernanke

    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said Sunday that he had to "hold my nose" over last year's taxpayer-financed bailouts of big financial companies but argued that the action had to be taken to avoid a major meltdown of the U.S. financial system and the broader economy.

  • Cash Register

    "The nosedive is over," says one economist about Friday's second-quarter GDP report.  "Nevertheless, you come out of this looking past the second quarter with a very uneven recovery picture."

  • Corning stock  softened in early morning trading despite reporting better-than-expected second-quarter earnings on Monday.

  • Columns and steps

    States are spending hundreds of thousands of dollars apiece on special legislative sessions whose chief purpose, ironically, is to trim more funding from their eroding budgets.

  • Hotel Hospitality

    A federal minimum wage increase that takes effect Friday could prolong the recession, some economists say, by forcing small businesses to lay off the same workers that the pay hike passed in better times was meant to help.

  • Tow Truck

    People assume a dismal economy means good times for repo men. But as the creditors who hire them aim to cut costs, these automotive bounty hunters are struggling along with the rest of American business.

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    Warren Buffett appeared live on CNBC's Squawk Box this morning to promote a new online animated series called the Secret Millionaire's Club in which he teaches kids about finance and investing. Buffett told us that stocks are still a better investment than cash investments, like Treasuries, even though the Dow has recently rallied to its highs of the year over 9000.  This is a transcript of the CNBC interview.