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Economic Measures Inflation

  • Tuesday: President Obama signed the $787 billion economic stimulus bill into law, as governments around the world consider their own actions. But global markets plunged on fears of a deepening recession; Chrysler asked the U.S. for $2 billion more in loans and General Motors is widely expected to follow suit. Investors are fleeing to bonds and gold-backed securities. CNBC heard from experts who warned that the March "bear market bull" won't happen — but that we are, indeed, in a "bottoming process."

  • Paul McCulley, managing director of Pimco, says he is looking for more details on the bank rescue plan than Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner's is willing to provide.

  • The U.S. trade deficit fell to the lowest level in nearly six years in December as the recession depressed demand for imports.

  • Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner

    Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner defended his newly announced financial bailout plan, telling CNBC that "the financial crisis is enormously complicated" and will take time to resolve.

  • Stimulus Package

    Here's a comparison of the $838 billion economic recovery plan passed by the Senate with an $820 billion version passed by the House.

  • Government action to shore up the economy and improve the housing climate probably will send mortgage rates to 4.5 percent, Bill Gross, co-CEO at the Pimco bond fund, said Monday.

  • As central banks around the world race to cut interest rates to historic lows and try to stimulate growth through domestic spending, the risk of future inflation grows larger.

  • The latest employment data shows a loss of 598,000 jobs in January, slightly more than expected, while the unemployment rate shot up to 7.6 percent.  CNBC asked economists, executives and political leaders what the deep cuts mean for the economy.

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    There are jobs available, but  financial types will have to make drastic changes—including going into a different field, accepting less money and possibly moving.

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    Economists predict another steep decline in payrolls for January, with the jobless rate expected to reach 7.5%.

  • The Fed could cause Zimbabwe-like inflation making the US a 'banana republic,' famous bear Marc Faber said.

  • Marc Faber, better known as Dr. Doom thinks there's value in Asian markets where you get paid to wait out the recession.  He also sees inflation as a major problem looming ahead in the future of the U.S. economy. 

  • “We need a stimulus bill, and we need it now,” said Jack Bogle, founder of the Vanguard Group.  Bogle said the U.S. is in a deep recession that could turn worse if actions are not taken quickly.

  • Wall Street Trader

    Whether it's Friday's jobs report or some other bad news, the stock market is likely to retest the November lows. But pros say look past the bottom and start buying.

  • cashoutlook.jpg

    Today is the day Californians begin to personally feel the pain of the state's massive budget gap. As Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and top legislative leaders continue to meet behind closed doors to hammer out a plan covering the current $16 billion gap—projected to grow to $42 billion by June, 2010—the state controller is delaying $3.5 billion in payments to conserve cash.

  • Crowd of people on the street

    Not  even big layoffs can convince investors that companies are shoring up their balance sheet and are a safe place to put money.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    Below is the statement released by the Federal Open Market Committee after its Jan. 27-28 meeting on interest rate policy:

  • Nouriel Roubini, RGE Monitor

    US and global stocks are still likely to fall because the corporate and economic news will be worse than expected, Nouriel Roubini, RGE Monitor Chairman, told CNBC in Davos.

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    The recent lull in the government bond market's bullish tone only enhances the arguments for ramping-up a portfolio of the heretofore dullards of the financial markets.

  • Global stocks ended the week lower Friday on heightened economic fears. The dollar and government bonds gained as investors parked their money in safe havens.