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Economic Measures Inflation

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    Washington, taking a page out of Hollywood, looks set to release Stimulus 2, the sequel.  And if anything, it may be the mother of all economic stimulus packages.

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    Consumer confidence suffered its steepest monthly drop on record in October, a survey showed Friday, as the worst financial crisis in generations took its toll.

  • WALL STREET IN CRISIS - A CNBC SPECIAL REPORT

    Regulators are expected to approve a clearinghouse for credit derivative swaps in the next several weeks, CNBC has learned.

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    U.S. consumers cut their monthly spending for the first time in two years during September, evidently bracing for hard times as jobs continue to disappear and credit conditions tighten.

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    Prices in Japan kept climbing in September, the government said Friday, but the pace of inflation appears to have peaked this summer as energy costs ease.

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    A divided Bank of Japan cut interest rates for the first time in seven years on Friday, under government pressure to join the global response to the worst financial crisis in 80 years.

  • If there's been any rush here lately, it's been away from the commodity. But is that about to change? Cramer interviewed Agnico-Eagle Mines CEO Sean Boyd to find out.

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    U.S. banks' direct borrowing from the Federal Reserve fell last week, although it remained at very high levels even as the U.S. central bank made its first foray into the commercial lending markets, Fed data showed

  • Janet L. Yellen

    Recent trends in the U.S. economy are "deeply worrisome" at a time damage from the credit crunch has outpaced the Federal Reserve's huge interest rate cuts, a top Fed policy-maker said Thursday.

  • iPods, iPhones ... iBonds? The pros and cons of newly fashionable inflation bonds.

  • As the Federal Reserve slashed a key interest rate by 50 basis points on Wednesday, Pimco's Bill Gross said he expects rates to hold or decline to 1 percent.

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    Below is the statement released by the Federal Open Market Committee after its Oct. 28-29 meeting on interest rate policy:

  • The Federal Reserve will unveil its decision on interest rates Wednesday afternoon, and a cut is widely expected by investors. CNBC asked former Federal Reserve officials to weigh in on the upcoming decision.

  • Tony Crescenzi

    The real story regarding the Federal Reserve is its various liquidity operations; the federal funds rate is second fiddle. The federal funds rate nonetheless remains a powerful tool and it would be a mistake to dismiss its importance for two reasons.

  • The wave of stock selloffs sweeping world markets may be partially caused by the fact that many governments increased guarantees for bank deposits, making them a much safer investment, Marc Faber, author of the "Gloom, Doom and Boom Report," told CNBC Monday.

  • On his last day as chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Alan Greenspan smiles as he presides over his final Federal Open Market Committee meeting at the the Fed's headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006. He is speaking to Deborah J. Danker, at left, special assistant to the board, with Vice Chairman Roger W. Ferguson Jr., at right. Greenspan has held the post for more than 18 years and is widely viewed as the most successful chairman in the Fed's 92-year h

    Lawmakers have called key players from the past and present to congressional hearings in an effort to find out what caused the biggest financial crisis since the 1930s and determine how the government plans to get the nation out of the mess.

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    The big debate now is how deep and how long the recession will be. The short answer is bad enough and probably the worst in 25 years.

  • The cruel earnings season for the American worker intensified Wednesday as more companies announced layoffs.

  • The US economy is entering a two-year recession that will be longer and deeper than previously feared, said Nouriel Roubini, a well-known economist and professor at New York University.

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    The fundamentals for commodities were not affected by government policies that are propagating inflation, Jim Rogers, CEO of Rogers Holdings, told CNBC Wednesday.