Economic Measures Inflation

  • Dollar Bill

    The dollar retreated broadly Tuesday, posting its steepest loss against the euro in two weeks, hurt by concerns about the health of the U.S. economy and the global financial sector.

  • Dollar Bill

    The dollar rallied across the board Monday on better-than-expected U.S. existing home sales data and J.P. Morgan's higher offer for Bear Stearns shares, which boosted Wall Street stocks.

  • British Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

    British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and French President Nicolas Sarkozy will urge banks this week to make "full and immediate disclosure" of write-offs due to the global credit crisis, British officials said on Monday.

  • Traders buy and sell crude oil futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange.

    Even the most seasoned commodity traders are looking back on this month's market action as nothing short of dramatic. Continued turmoil in the equity markets and falling confidence in the U.S. dollar sent investors scurrying into the relative safe haven of the commodities markets like droves of mad March hares.

  • Dollar Bill

    The U.S. dollar inched lower against the euro on Friday but held on to much of the gains it made the previous day when investors sold commodities including oil and gold and repatriated cash back into the dollar.

  • Dollar Bill

    The dollar made its biggest gain since mid-December against the euro Thursday as investors sold oil, gold and other commodities and repatriated their cash back into the beleaguered U.S. currency.

  • The dollar briefly reversed losses against the euro on Wednesday in volatile trading, drawing support from losses in gold futures.

  • Ben Bernanke, President Bush's top economic adviser, speaks in the Oval Office at the White House after Bush named him to take over the Federal Reserve from retiring Alan Greenspan, in Washington, Monday, Oct. 24, 2005. It was the third time in as many years the president has turned to the 51-year-old Bernanke for a sensitive post. Bush named him to the Fed board in 2002, then made him chairman of the president's Council of Economic Advisers earlier this year. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke’s stock is at a 52-week high on Wall Street --- with the exception perhaps of Bear Stearns, which appears to be selling him short.

  • A day after the Federal Reserve cut interest rates another three-quarters of a point, CEOs joined Squawk Box to share their outlook on the economy and markets.

  • Two of the nine Bank of England policymakers opposed this month's decision to keep interest  rates at 5.25 percent, preferring an immediate quarter-point cut to shore up the economy in the face of a global downturn.

  • Today's statement is another in a series of very significant communications from the Fed. At the extreme, it could mean the Fed is done cutting rates, barring any more massive credit-market upheavals.

  • Dollars and Euro

    The dollar posted gains against the yen and the euro on Tuesday after the Federal Reserve slashed benchmark interest rates by 75 basis points.

  • The Fed commentary, on top of the positive Lehman and Goldman numbers, are helping move stocks to the highs of the day. The Fed has: 1) Reduced the growth forecast, and increased the inflation forecast. 2) Talked less on credit problems.

  • Credit Crunch

    The size of the Fed’s expected rate cut today may help stimulate a sluggish economy. But  it is unlikely to unfreeze the credit markets, especially the mortgage one.

  • FED_RESERVE2.jpg

    The Federal Reserve slashed a key U.S. interest rate by three-quarters of a point, to 2.25%, but Wall Street didn't seem to care that the cut was smaller than many had expected.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.
  • U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said on Tuesday the U.S. economy had turned down sharply but declined to label the situation a recession.

  • Federal Reserve Bank Chairman Ben Bernanke

    Fed policy-makers are expected to make the biggest interest rate cut since 1982, while two major Wall Street firms provided some relief to investors with better-than-expected earnings.

  • Credit Crunch

    As the credit crunch worsens,  the Federal Reserve is becoming  more imaginative in its tactics. Wall Street is now betting on a full-point cut in interest rates, to  2%,  when the Fed meets Tuesday.

  • INFLATION_noTEXT.jpg

    The flagging U.S. economy got more mixed news from its troubled housing sector on Tuesday, while evidence of inflation pressures continued to lurk in the producer pipeline.