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  • Verizon Wireless

    Though international markets are increasingly important growth areas for both Apple and Google, the U.S. is still vitally important – and perhaps nothing illustrates that better than the drama that will begin to unfold on Thursday. We can call it the Battle for Verizon.

  • Rob Neyer

    The baseball columnist known for his in-depth analysis loved by baseball’s stat lovers told CNBC.com he is headed to SB Nation, a network of 295 sports blogs with more than 500 contributors that has raised nearly $24 million in funding since it was started by Tyler Bleszinski and his AthleticsNation blog in 2003.

  • Protestors ride an armoured personnel carrier towards the Nile on January 29, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Tens of thousands of demonstrators have taken to the streets across Egypt in Cairo, Suez, and Alexandria to call for the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak.

    As the political crisis in Egypt unfolds and Internet service remains blocked by local authorities, engineers from Twitter, Google and SayNow launched a special "speak-to-tweet" service for people on the ground to stay connected with each other and the outside world.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Tuesday's Squawk on the Street.

  • A new stat on copyright infringement released today is shocking: 23.8 percent of all global Internet traffic involves digital theft with BitTorrent accounting for 11.4 percent.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Monday's Squawk on the Street.

  • livingsocial_200.jpg

    LivingSocial is making major gains on its bigger rival, Groupon, which dominates the daily deals space with 50 million users. Once a distant second, LivingSocial's big discount offer from Amazon, which invested $175 million in the company, really put it on the map. LivingSocial added five million subscribers in January, hitting 20 million subscribers.

  • Plus, get calls on the Nasdaq’s pullback, Ford’s earnings and more.

  • Twitter

    I've been on Twitter since Dec. 22, 2008. I have sent out more than 12,200 tweets. That's an average of 16 tweets a day. That's a lot. That's a problem.

  • wef_schmidt_93.jpg

    Top management at Google plans no major changes in its direction, even though two of the top executives shifting roles in April, CEO Eric Schmidt told CNBC Friday.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Friday's Squawk on the Street.

  • Cramer thinks these sectors are ready to start their next push higher.

  • LinkedIn

    LinkedIn has filed its S-1 with the SEC, the first step towards an initial public offering for up to $175 million.

  • Microsoft

    The software giant reported earnings of $6.63 billion, or 77 cents a share for its fiscal second quarter, versus $6.66 billion, or 74 cents a share a year ago.

  • Amazon.com's fulfillment center in Fernley, Nevada.

    The online retailer's shares plunged in extended trading Thursday after the firm reported revenue that fell below what Wall Street had expected.

  • Cable TV

    Consumers are pinching pennies anywhere they can due to continued concern over the global economy , which for some means a willingness to cut services that aren't a necessity.

  • Netflix

    On the heels of yesterday's earnings the stock is up around fifteen percent today. And it's not just the higher-than expected subscriber numbers and earnings: a slew of analysts have upgraded the stock and their price targets today. These analysts are not spooked by a sky-high valuation - Netflix's current p/e is 79.

  • As snow blankets the Northeast, the "Fast Money" traders consider whether the cold is throwing off economic figures.

  • Google Voice App

    An unscientific study of Internet calling apps — all available for Android phones and iPhones — discovers strengths and weaknesses in the likes of Google Voice and Fring.

  • Twitter

    If potential employees aren't following a company's Twitter feed—or they're falling asleep while reading it—the "open position" tweets aren't going to cull any talent. So what's a corporate Twitterer to do? Weed out the nonsense and check your Tweets for these vitals.