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  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Friday's Squawk on the Street.

  • Yahoo! CEO Carol Bartz

    Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz has got a full-blown crisis on her hands, as three key executives are headed for the door.

  • Value investor Whitney Tilson of T2 Partners shares his top stock picks for the fourth quarter.

  • Google. Apple. Intel. Adobe. Pixar. Intuit. All names that many in the technology field would give their right hand to work for. Each has garnered a reputation eliciting superlatives for innovation and leadership. But as last week's settlement of a U.S. Department of Justice investigation revealed, each has engaged in hiring practices that hindered advancement for both employees and the industry.

  • Six in 60

    Here's why you should keep a close eye on these six stocks.

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    Deep inside the computer worm that some specialists suspect is aimed at slowing Iran’s race for a nuclear weapon lies what could be a fleeting reference to the Book of Esther, the Old Testament tale in which the Jews pre-empt a Persian plot to destroy them.

  • CEO Jeff Lunsford tells Cramer all about it.

  • Mike Sutherlin, CEO of Joy Global, talks candidly about takeovers with the desk.

  • Negotiating Pay

    Ongo, a Silicon Valley startup planning to launch a website for reading and sharing news from multiple sources, says it received an initial round of funding from some of the country's top newspaper publishers.

  • Six in 60

    Here's why you should keep a close eye on these six stocks.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Wednesday's Squawk on the Street.

  • Plus, get calls on the banks, tech and more.

  • AOL

    AOL is buying TechCrunch.com, part of CEO Tim Armstrong's plan to what he calls "doubling down" on content.

  • She says the social network's ad business is booming: saying it's been a "big year," and that they're working with all the biggest advertisers. She wouldn't comment directly on competing with Google for ad dollars, but she's clearly confident in their competitive position saying. Facebook is the number one site and advertisers want to be where their customers are.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Tuesday's Squawk on the Street.

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    Share your opinion in today's poll.

  • Twitter

    I caught up with the CEO of Twitter from the annual Advertising Week conference in Manhattan; he tells us demand for Twitter's ads is far outpacing the company's supply. Williams says that not only are more companies looking to advertise on Twitter, but each company also wants to spend more on ads.

  • Sonny Steward, left, Amanda Steward, right, and Alma Gonzales, back to camera, prepare DVD's to be mailed from Blockbuster Inc.'s distribution center in Dallas

    Blockbuster was doomed to failure the moment Netflix came along: that's one narrative arc that has been appearing ever since the video rental giant started staggering. And it's gained not a little traction since Blockbuster's bankruptcy filing last week. Which is a shame, because it happens to be untrue.

  • AOL

    We caught up with AOL CEO Tim Armstrong at Advertising Week where he's pitching his new "Devil Ads" platform. The new Devil ads are bigger and more interactive, with more video —Armstrong says he expects them to be far more effective.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Monday's Squawk on the Street.