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Information Technology Internet

  • Hot Topic's Facebook page

    Companies are still searching for a successful marketing strategy for social media. Here's what Best Buy, Hot Topic, Target and The Gap are doing.

  • Ebay Earnings

    Like Yahoo, the worst might very well now be in eBay's rear view mirror, and that's good. But like Yahoo, eBay's growth and return for investors may not be as robust as other players in its sector specifically, and other players in tech more generally, and that's not so good.

  • Yahoo Earnings

    It's no secret that I was tough on Yahoo during the difficult years.  Calling attention to management missteps became a blood sport of sorts.  I was tough, but I believe, fair. Tonight's earnings topped expectations but disappointed markets. Still, there's a part of Yahoo's report tonight that's deserving of some extra attention.

  • Apple Earnings

    At a time when just about everyone is worried about the American consumer and whether the time has come to start spending again, Apple once again proves the exception to the rule: The company beats the Street handily on the bottom line, but blows past expectations on the top, exceeding estimates by a cool $1.5 billion.

  • facebook_friends_200.jpg

    Ahead of Facebook's developer conference the social media behemoth announced some new features designed not for developers, but for users, to get them to engage even more with the site by expanding connections beyond friends.

  • Yahoo Earnings

    Yahoo will report its first quarter earnings tonight and as the company's stock teeters anew near a 52-week high, investors have to be wondering whether the time has finally come for this company. Well, kind of.

  • Images of the "next-generation iPhone" began appearing online over the weekend.

    For anyone who has ever lost a cellphone, remember this: it could be worse. You could be the person who left his phone in a bar in California. And it wasn’t just any phone; it was a supersecret version of the next iPhone.

  • Apple Earnings

    With iPad selling well, and new iPhones coming, it's getting harder for Apple to dampen expectations. Apple's guidance tonight may still be tepid, but likely less so than in the past.

  • IBM Earnings

    IBM shares took a hit as soon as its first quarter numbers hit the tape, despite a healthy top and bottomline beat. Those pesky gross margins did the company in, but after a moment or two, cooler heads prevailed, and IBM shares began to recover.

  • Apple's logo on a wall of an Apple store

    Ouch. That'd be the snap analysis of the new market research from NPD about Mac sales in March, and the news for Apple simply isn't good.

  • Facebook

    With Facebook's annual developers conference on Wednesday the web is buzzing about what the social network will unveil. The site already has 400 million unique users, half of which go to the site daily: so the question becomes how to extend Facebook's community beyond the website itself.

  • IBM Earnings

    IBM is cheap, no two ways about it. As the company gets set to report its earnings tonight, keep that in mind as we parse each and every word of Big Blue's guidance.

  • Chinese students play online computer games at an internet cafe in Hangzhou.

    Google’s decision last month to remove some of its operations from China has overshadowed a startling dynamic at work in this country, a place where young people complain that there is not a lot to do: the Internet, already a potent social force here, has become the country’s prime entertainment service.

  • This will be a critical week for tech investors, and if last week's news from Intel and Google was any indication, the news ahead could be very good indeed.

  • PALM

    It's the last thing Palm needed to hear: The crown jewel in its family of assets, its WebOS operating system, is fraught with security vulnerabilities, according to mobile security consultancy Intrepidus which will release details of a year-long investigation early next week.

  • Google Headquarters

    The online advertising giant reported an improved quarter that topped expectations, but that wasn't enough to please investors accustomed to blockbuster results.

  • Google Earnings

    What a strange day for Google. First, some developments on the conference call. Tonight's call, unusually, didn't include CEO Eric Schmidt, Larry Page or Sergey Brin.

  • The benchmark for US stocks stands just about 2 to 3 percent away from the levels when Lehman Brothers declared bankruptcy — the last chance investors had to get their money out before Lehman’s collapse lit a fuse to the market collapse. This may trigger more than just bad memories for investors, traders and analysts said.

  • It’s time for this tech bellwether to get some of it’s mojo back, Cramer says.

  • Receptionist at Baidu.com office

    A day ahead of Google's earnings, there was this bizarre development from its Chinese rival: Baidu is now trading at over 100 times this year's earnings.