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Crime Investment Fraud

  • After the Hurricane, Beware of Scams Named for Sandy

    Callers touting hurricane-related investments may be scam artists capitalizing on the storm.

  • Next Insider Trading Trial to Begin

    A look ahead to next week's insider trading trial of Anthony Chaisson, Level Global Investors co-founder, with CNBC's Gary Kaminsky.

  • Follow these rules and you'll greatly reduce the chance that you financial adviser turns out to be a disaster, or, worse, a crook.

  • Protecting Your Reputation Online

    Michael Fertik, Reputation.com founder & CEO, discusses the fast way to protect yourself from online cyber attacks.

  • Imprisoned Whistleblower Receives $104 Million From US Government

    CNBC's Eamon Javers reports the U.S. government will award Bradley Birkenfeld $104 million for information he provided about Swiss bank, UBS.

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    State securities administrators listed four new types of fraud among their annual list of investor threats, including crowdfunding scams and gold-related ripoffs.

  • The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s has included some of the world’s most notorious criminals, including Osama Bin Laden, Ted Bundy, and Warren Jeffs — totaling 497 since its creation in 1950. Of these fugitives, 466 have been apprehended or located, according to the FBI. Of these, 154 arrests have been assisted by the public through methods such as the information posted on the website and disseminated “wanted” posters. With the success of the “Most Wanted” list, the bureau began putting phot

    Who are some of these white collar fugitives and what did they do to attract the FBI’s attention? Find out.

  • Money Laundering Scam

    Attorney Dennis Kearney describes how Solomon Dwek would launder money through the Deal Yeshiva, a Jewish Day School in New Jersey.

  • American Greed: The Jersey Score Evidence File #2

    Surveillance video of Solomon Dwek and Vincent Tabbachino, the former Guttenberg, New Jersey councilman who plead guilty to money laundering and was sentenced to a 41-month prison term.

  • Key Witness Kumar Receives Two Year Probation

    CNBC's Scott Cohn reports Anil Kumar will pay a $25,000 fine in connection with the Galleon insider trading case.

  • American Greed: The Fugitives

    Go on the hunt to catch the most wanted white-collar fugitives!

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    Short selling is never going to be a wildly popular investing practice, but it is perfectly legal and essential for the proper function of the capital markets. I asked a biotech short seller for his thoughts on why long investors seem so hostile to short sellers and whether this animosity will compel short sellers to be even more reluctant to voice their opinions publicly.

  • PFG Told Employees All's Well Days Before Collapse

    CNBC's Scott Cohn has the latest details on the investigation of PFGBest's bankruptcy, after regulators alleged the firm misstated $200 million in customer accounts.

  • Wall Street's Wildest Con

    Discussing one of Wall Street's biggest frauds and how the rogue hedge fund manager tried to fake his own suicide to avoid prison, with Guy Lawson, "Octopus" author.

  • Santelli on Regulations, Rules & Rubes

    Discussing common sense and effective regulations, with CNBC's Rick Santelli.

  • Cayman  Islands

    As hedge funds become a dominant force in the investing universe, directorship services have grown into a big business on the Cayman Islands. And because of a quirk in the island’s tax code, these funds must appoint a board, the New York Times reports.

  • Barclays Libor Fallout

    Discussing the resignation of Marcus Agius, Barclays' CEO, less than a week after the British bank agreed to pay $450 million in fines for its role in fixing interest rate prices, with Gary Gensler, Commodity Futures Trading Commission chairman.

  • Peter Madoff Pleads Guilty!

    CNBC's Mary Thompson reports the latest details on the Madoff Ponzi scheme.

  • Peter Madoff Expected to Plead Guilty

    Peter Madoff, the younger brother of Ponzi schemer Bernie Madoff, is expected to plead guilty later today to securities fraud for his role in the Madoff Ponzi scheme, reports CNBC's Mary Thompson.

  • The term financial fraud usually brings to mind names like Bernie Madoff, Raj Rajaratnam and Allen Stanford, to name a few. All three men are now doing time in prison for their respective crimes. is serving 150 years for his $50 billion Ponzi scheme. found guilty of insider trading charges, was sentenced to 11 years behind bars. received a 110 year sentence for his $7 billion Ponzi scheme. However, these notorious cases are far from the only ones involving financial crimes. From money managers w

    While not every one of these Wall Street jailbirds had offices in downtown Manhattan, they all dealt in the financial world. Click ahead to see those who have traded in their pinstripes for prison stripes.