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Europe Top News and Analysis Ireland

  • United States Federal Reserve

    Since the US central bank launched its $600 billion round of asset purchases at the start of November, its critics have not hesitated to accuse it of recklessness, incompetence and conspiracy to devalue the dollar, often in vitriolic terms, the FT reports.

  • New York Stock Exchange, lower Manhattan, New York City.

    European finance ministers meet Monday and Tuesday as the Irish vote on their budget. The White House and Congress, meanwhile, are expected to move toward a compromise extending the Bush tax cuts.

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    European shares are seen opening little changed Friday after Thursday's strong gains, with investors waiting for widely-watched US nonfarm payrolls data for near-term market direction.

  • M&A counselor and senior chairman at Sullivan & Cromwell, Rodgin Cohen, gave his outlook in a CNBC interview Thursday on two key economic issues — the U.S. reaching a deal on extending expiring tax cuts and Europe holding the line with Spain.

  • Dublin, Ireland

    Ireland’s banks are among the most exposed to some of the other weaker euro zone nations, in spite of the industry’s tiny network of foreign operations. The FT reports.

  • Amid spreading fears of additional nations falling victim to the european debt crisis, Spain's Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero told CNBC on Wednesday about his confidence in his country's latest reforms.

  • Job Search

    Youth unemployment represents one of the most significant barriers to economic and social development throughout the world, John Studzinski is Senior Managing Director and Head of Financial Advisory at Blackstone says in this guest blog for CNBC.

  • Unemployment Line

    At the global level, the youth unemployment rate in 2009 was 2.7 times higher than the adult unemployment rate. In four of nine regions the ratio went beyond 3. Why are youth unemployment rates so much higher than adult rates?

  • NYSE trader.

    The mortgage mess bites big banks, the municipal debt crunch becomes a crisis and a surprise move from Jamie Dimon.

  • European Union logo

    The euro nears parity with the dollar, the Bank of England undertakes its own QE2 and Greece opts to restructure its debt.

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    The next 24 hours could prove a major turning point in Europe’s crisis, one that substantially reduces the risk for all investors on world markets.

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    European stock index futures pointed to a rebound for equities on Wednesday, with better-than-expected Chinese manufacturing data helping to bolster positive sentiment.

  • A trader sits in front of a board displaying Germany's share index DAX at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    Even as Europe struggles to contain its latest debt crisis, fresh fissures are emerging that show the euro zone diverging into two — or even three — different economic parts that threaten to compound the problems even further. The NYT reports.

  • Here's how Ireland's EU bailout went down.

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    The EU bailout for Irish banks failed to quell financial markets. Borrowing costs for Portugal, Spain and others continue to rise, because structural problems created by the euro and single European market remain unaddressed and more crises are inevitable.

  • Reichstag Parliment building, Berlin, Germany

    A look at recent German headlines shows the difficulty the government of the euro zone’ biggest country faces in satisfying both the demands of its euro zone partners and those of its citizens.

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    European shares were set to rise Tuesday, bouncing back from seven-week closing lows in the previous session on worries about the euro zone debt crisis, after Wall Street cut its losses.

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    Europe's sovereign debt woes will continue to tug at markets, as investors Tuesday also get a few new pieces of U.S. economic data and hear from Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke on the economy.

  • Stocks declined, but ended significantly off session lows, as financials gained and the dollar slipped, although investors remained concerned about the effectiveness of Europe's attempt to contain sovereign debt troubles.  HP and Home Depot fell, while AmEx and BofA rose.

  • Stocks came back from session lows as financials gained, although the market remained lower amid continuing fears about Europe's ability to harness a credit crisis despite a weekend bailout agreement for Ireland. HP and Home Depot fell, while AmEx and BofA rose.