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Europe Top News and Analysis Ireland

  • Dublin, Ireland

    Ireland, North and South Korea, Congress and more - here's what you need to know for this week.

  • U.S. stock index futures slid deeper into negative territory ahead of the open Monday as a final agreement on Ireland's bailout fund failed to lift investor sentiment.

  • Aerial view of a town square Bruges Belgium

    The premium investors demand to hold Belgian government bonds rather than benchmark German debt rose to its widest level since early 2009 on Monday as the country issued 2 billion euros of 2014, 2020 and 2035-dated bonds.

  • Nouriel Roubini

    Economist Nouriel Roubini says Portugal should consider asking for a bailout before its financial plight worsens.

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    European shares were indicated higher Monday, expected to reverse some of last week's losses after the European Union agreed an 85 billion euros ($113 billion) bailout for Ireland at the weekend.

  • Ireland and European Union

    According to a statement released by the Irish government, the country will take €10 billion immediately to boost the capital reserves of its banks. Another €25 billion earmarked for the banks will remain in reserve.

  • Dublin, Ireland

    An Irish government minister said he expects an agreement on an EU-IMF bailout loan for Ireland worth approximately €85 billion ($115 billion), but he rejected reports that the aid would carry a punitively high interest rate.

  • Job seekers wait in line to have their résumés reviewed at the second annual Anaheim/Orange County Job Fair.

    Next week brings November's employment report, a critical bit of data in a week likely to be dominated by readings on the U.S. economy and the developing debt crisis in Europe.

  • dublin commuters the earl

    Ireland's banks suffered a string of credit downgrades Friday—one reduced to junk-bond status —as speculation mounted that an EU-IMF bailout of Ireland could require senior bondholders to share the massive bill.

  • NY Stock Exchange Traders

    While the market pullback isn't even in the realm of a correction, worries that Europe's debt crisis could  hurt the global economy are weighing on what otherwise could be a robust rally.

  • Euros at an angle

    Here's the disturbing headline statistic: Portugal, Ireland, Greece, and Spain have sucked out 93 percent of the total liquidity taken from the ECB and other central banks.

  • leie river ghent belgium

    Belgium faces an important test Monday, when it aims to sell between 1.5 billion euros ($1.9 billion) and 2.5 billion euros worth of bonds in an auction that will indicate the level of investor confidence in the nation plagued by political turmoil and high levels of debt.

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    Fears of contagion from the euro zone crisis were running high Friday but correlations between markets suggested investors were not as afraid of a systemic crisis as they were back in May and June.

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    European shares are expected to retreat on Friday after gains in the previous two sessions, with persistent concerns about euro zone debt problems and Chinese inflation seen putting pressure on the market.

  • Ireland is actually in a better economic position than other struggling euro zone states, Chris Watling, managing director at Longview Economics, told CNBC Thursday.

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    European shares were set to open higher on Thursday, adding to gains in the previous session, and after Wall Street rose on upbeat economic data. 

  • Shoppers leave a store on 'Black Friday' in New York City.

    As shoppers hit the stores this Thanksgiving weekend, investors are likely to keep bidding up retail stocks even as some of those stocks hit multi-year or even all-time highs.

  • Stocks finished the session sharply higher Wednesday ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, following a handful of reports that offered some hope that the U.S. economy was improving.

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    Nations are left with old playbooks and fewer choices by which to resolve their respective problems. This means that time, devaluations, and debt restructurings might be the only way out for many nations. It also means the citizenry will require politicians that can think outside of the box and act with greater unity and resolve than perhaps they are used to.

  • Stocks were trading sharply higher Wednesday following a handful of reports that offered some hope that the U.S. economy was improving.