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Europe Top News and Analysis Italy

  • The European Central Bank left rates unchanged as expected on Thursday, with analysts saying the doves in the governing council had the upper hand.  The Bank of England also left the rates on hold, with analysts expecting it to ease monetary policy early next year.

  • European Central Bank policymakers have been relaxed about the euro's steep rise against the  dollar -- in public at least -- but its move towards $1.50 is raising the prospect that it might intervene.

  • The European Central Bank should take into account a range of factors such as the strong euro and high oil prices when setting monetary policy, France's Secretary of State for Europe Jean-Pierre Jouyet said on Wednesday.

  • European stocks rose slightly Tuesday, snapping a three-day losing streak, as investors embraced some upbeat earnings reports from the likes of Swiss Reinsurance and U.K. retailer Marks & Spencer.

  • European shares declined for a third straight session on Monday, with banks again topping the losers' list as Citigroup's warning of loan losses sparked fresh worries over the impact of credit market woes.

  • Global banks are going to take far longer than previously imagined to clear away debris left by a receding tide of U.S. subprime mortgages which has played havoc with balance sheets, a top investment banker said on Monday.

  • Euro zone factory growth sank to its slowest pace in over two years in October, led by a sharp slowdown in Germany and a contraction in Spain, final figures from a key monthly survey showed on Friday.

  • European bank stocks took a dive on Thursday as fear spread among investors that the U.S. subprime crisis will take another huge chunk out of profits in the fourth quarter.

  • Major European markets ended in positive territory Monday, as anticipation of lower U.S. interest rates helped sentiment.

  • Britain only has itself to blame for how problems at Northern Rock turned into the first run on a UK bank in 140 years, the European Union's top financial regulator, Charlie McCreevy, is expected to say later Friday.

  • Fiat said Wednesday that net profit more than doubled in the third quarter, leading it to raise its full-year targets on a strong performance by its core auto division and good results in its truck and farm machinery operations.

  • Euro zone services growth bounced back much more than expected this month after hitting a two-year low in September, but the manufacturing expansion waned further, a key survey showed on Wednesday.

  • European Union leaders clinched final agreement on Friday on a treaty to reform the 27-nation bloc's institutions, replacing a defunct constitution and ending a two-year crisis of confidence in Europe's future.

  • One Bank of England policymaker wanted to cut borrowing costs this month, but was outgunnned by the other eight who argued new forecasts in November would  provide a better steer on how the economy was faring.

  • Euro zone economic growth will slow this year and next as fallout from the summer's financial market turmoil hits housing and a stronger euro crimps exports, the International Monetary Fund said on Wednesday.

  • Gazprom is ready to sell up to 50 percent of its forthcoming Italian gas distribution and marketing unit to local investors, the daily MF said without giving a source.

  • Better-than-expected earnings from mobile-phone company Sony Ericsson boosted telecommunications stocks in Europe and added to a firm close for the major indexes Monday.

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    European Central Bank President Jean-Claude Trichet signaled the bank was still biased towards a rate hike, despite calls for action to curb the euro's rise against the dollar.

  • A sprinkling of deal news, sinking oil prices and a firmer dollar are in the background as stocks edge higher Tuesday. The big news for markets though will come in the Federal Reserve's meeting minutes, set for release at 2 p.m. ET. The minutes of the September 18 meeting and the August 16 call will be released. Traders are watching for hints of what made the Fed take the aggressive step to slash the Fed funds rate by a half point, greater than the 1/4 point widely expected.

  • European Union finance ministers agreed on Tuesday to review a slew of financial rules in the light of the summer's credit squeeze that tipped securities markets into turmoil.