Funny Business with Jane Wells

Jane Wells

Jane Wells
Special Correspondent, CNBC

Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com. Based in Los Angeles, she also contributes to CNBC's breaking news coverage.

Wells assumed her current role after more than 20 years as a CNBC reporter. Most recently, she covered retail, agriculture and defense as well as reports on California's economy, West Coast real estate and Las Vegas for the network. Wells joined CNBC in 1996, providing special coverage of the O.J. Simpson civil case for "Rivera Live." During her career at the network, Wells also served as a senior correspondent for CNBC's "Upfront Tonight."

Prior to joining CNBC, she was a correspondent for the Fox News Channel and Los Angeles reporter for NBC's flagship television station, WNBC, in New York. Her television news career includes reporter positions with KTTV, Los Angeles; WTVJ, Miami; and KOB, Albuquerque. She has also contributed international reports for CNN.

Wells has received numerous honors for her work, including a 1992 Peabody Award and duPont Award for her role in the live coverage of the Rodney King Trial. That same year, she earned a Los Angeles Emmy Award for her investigative reporting. She also has received UPI, Press Club and Emmy Awards for feature reporting; three Florida Emmy Awards for news reporting; and the Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for team reporting.

Wells holds bachelor's degrees in broadcast journalism and philosophy from the University of Southern California, where she graduated with honors. She and her husband have two children and live in Los Angeles.

Follow Jane Wells on Twitter @janewells.

More

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    Tuesday night the annual Gracie Awards were handed out in Beverly Hills, as the American Women in Radio & Television recognized outstanding programming on television and radio by women and about women.

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    A little known program allows foreigners to invest in U.S. businesses and create jobs in exchange for a green card. Think of it as "immigration through investment". Foreigners can apply for it by proving they'll pour $1 million into a U.S. company.

  • Crisis in the Gulf

    I've been following the BP oil spill story, getting updates online from CNBC.com, as well as BP's own outreach on Twitter. Then I stumbled across a Twitter account for BP Global PR. Except it's not really BP Global PR. It's a hilarious send-up of spin.

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    Mindless spending is back. That's the only explanation I can find behind two new businesses offering luxury vacations... for toys.

  • Lance Armstrong

    As the Amgen Tour of California—the largest cycling event in the U.S.—was hitting its stride, the Wall Street Journal broke the story that former Tour de France champion Floyd Landis admitted to doping. He also implicated others, including some riding in this week's Tour, like Lance Armstrong. Armstrong again denies the allegations.

  • Microsoft

    The funny business of managing public perception. Today I'm checking in with friends on Facebook and Googling for news...all on my iPhone. Three big products and services from three big companies. I'm not sure I trust any of them. Just because, you know, they're big. Everywhere. Watching me. Using me.

  • business_mtg_200.jpg

    I hate meetings. Everyone gets together in a room, and suddenly someone wants to turn it into a social hour. Others like to hear themselves pontificate. It's human nature when you're meeting face to face—the cadence of required pleasantries, the necessary warm up before FINALLY getting to the point, the public comment period which no one seems willing to end, the always-too-long wind down.

  • Courtney Cox

    Now, however, the cougar concept may have "jumped the shark". The first sign was the creation of a prime time television series based on cougars. If cougars have gone mainstream, that could mean they're only a couple steps away from being sent to pop culture's elephant graveyard.

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    If you've ever been caught screaming at your kids in public, or giving them a little whack on the backside, I feel your humiliation. Raising children is the best job and the hardest job.

  • Open_sign_200.jpg

    When you live in California, as I do, it's easy to feel gloomy about the outlook for small businesses. I've blogged about it before. It's hard for the little guy to get by. Banks are loath to loan. In the middle of the country, however, it's not so bad.

More From Funny Business with Jane Wells

  • Jane Wells

    Based in Los Angeles, Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com.

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