×

CNBC U.S. Contributors

Jane Wells

Jane Wells
Special Correspondent, CNBC

Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com. Based in Los Angeles, she also contributes to CNBC's breaking news coverage.

Wells assumed her current role after more than 20 years as a CNBC reporter. Most recently, she covered retail, agriculture and defense as well as reports on California's economy, West Coast real estate and Las Vegas for the network. Wells joined CNBC in 1996, providing special coverage of the O.J. Simpson civil case for "Rivera Live." During her career at the network, Wells also served as a senior correspondent for CNBC's "Upfront Tonight."

Prior to joining CNBC, she was a correspondent for the Fox News Channel and Los Angeles reporter for NBC's flagship television station, WNBC, in New York. Her television news career includes reporter positions with KTTV, Los Angeles; WTVJ, Miami; and KOB, Albuquerque. She has also contributed international reports for CNN.

Wells has received numerous honors for her work, including a 1992 Peabody Award and duPont Award for her role in the live coverage of the Rodney King Trial. That same year, she earned a Los Angeles Emmy Award for her investigative reporting. She also has received UPI, Press Club and Emmy Awards for feature reporting; three Florida Emmy Awards for news reporting; and the Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for team reporting.

Wells holds bachelor's degrees in broadcast journalism and philosophy from the University of Southern California, where she graduated with honors. She and her husband have two children and live in Los Angeles.

Follow Jane Wells on Twitter @janewells.

More

  • BP Offshore Oil Strike board game

    In the "I'd never believe it if I didn't see it with my own eyes" category, BP once released a board game called "Offshore Oil Strike".

  • fireworks

    Is it unpatriotic to have a Fourth of July celebration without fireworks? Or is it fiscally responsible? That difficult choice is facing cities across America, as tight budgets have city managers weighing the mood-boosting value of throwing a traditional civic party against the realities of today's deficits.

  • Laptop Steering Wheel Table

    It's Friday. Fourth of July weekend. My Worst Traffic Nightmare. Whether folks are driving from LA to Vegas, Miami down to the Keys, Manhattan to the Hamptons, many drivers will seriously consider turning around and going home at some point.

  • Yankee Stadium

    A revised bond rating issued by Standard & Poor’s today provides an in-depth look at the New York Yankees’ 2009 revenues and it reveals that the champions grossed $397 million in ticket revenue, including $72 million on the postseason alone.

  • San Francisco

    California has about 225,000 organized state employees—still—and many have been forced to take three-day-a-month furloughs without pay. A few thousand of them converged on the Capitol Wednesday to protest threats by the Governor to impose the $7.25 minimum wage on them starting Thursday. There's no budget, and no solution to the $19.1 billion deficit.

  • California Attorney General and democratic candidate for governor Jerry Brown.

    I feel like a broken record. As the fiscal year ends, California is facing a crisis, with no budget…and a $19.1 billion…deficit…(yawn)…and no solution…zzzzzzz….. I’ve been reporting essentially the same thing for over two years, and while services have been cut and people are suffering, California, for the most part, is still functioning.

  • Vallejo, California Police

    Two years ago, the Bay Area city of 120,000 went into a special kind of bankruptcy reserved for local governments called Chapter 9. It allowed the city of break contracts and suspend debt payments.

  • mj_anniversary_2_200.jpg

    One year ago, they flooded Los Angeles and Santa Barbara by the thousands. They came from around the world—Michael Jackson fans devastated by his sudden death. The morning after he died, I reported from his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. People were ten deep huddling around that small spot. Traffic was a mess, as it was near the family home in Encino and up near Jackson's Neverland Ranch. Today, not so much.

  • What a difference a year makes. In June, 2009, Michael Jackson was on the cusp of a comeback tour which might have netted him a new fortune. But he faced a mountain of debt, seemingly unable to get his finances under control. His family's home was about to go into foreclosure, as even their utility bills were reportedly thousands of dollars past due.

  • Twilight Eclipse

    As the latest Twilight film, "Eclipse", prepares to take the nation by blood-drenched storm, marketing types are working overtime creating tie-ins, no matter how flimsy.