Funny Business with Jane Wells

Jane Wells

Jane Wells
Special Correspondent, CNBC

Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com. Based in Los Angeles, she also contributes to CNBC's breaking news coverage.

Wells assumed her current role after more than 20 years as a CNBC reporter. Most recently, she covered retail, agriculture and defense as well as reports on California's economy, West Coast real estate and Las Vegas for the network. Wells joined CNBC in 1996, providing special coverage of the O.J. Simpson civil case for "Rivera Live." During her career at the network, Wells also served as a senior correspondent for CNBC's "Upfront Tonight."

Prior to joining CNBC, she was a correspondent for the Fox News Channel and Los Angeles reporter for NBC's flagship television station, WNBC, in New York. Her television news career includes reporter positions with KTTV, Los Angeles; WTVJ, Miami; and KOB, Albuquerque. She has also contributed international reports for CNN.

Wells has received numerous honors for her work, including a 1992 Peabody Award and duPont Award for her role in the live coverage of the Rodney King Trial. That same year, she earned a Los Angeles Emmy Award for her investigative reporting. She also has received UPI, Press Club and Emmy Awards for feature reporting; three Florida Emmy Awards for news reporting; and the Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for team reporting.

Wells holds bachelor's degrees in broadcast journalism and philosophy from the University of Southern California, where she graduated with honors. She and her husband have two children and live in Los Angeles.

Follow Jane Wells on Twitter @janewells.

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  • Apple CEO, Steve Jobs

    CEO Steve Jobs' personal style, however, has been the subject of much debate, praise, and consternation over the years. Same black mock turtleneck. Same blue Levi's. Why? Lore has it that Jobs decided long ago to buy several black turtlenecks and several pairs of jeans so that he wouldn't ever have to waste time figuring out what to wear.

  • The Nike ad featuring Tiger Woods, seen here, will premiere tonight.

    As if Nike spacer and Tiger Woods needed more publicity. Whether you find it fascinating or creepy, the new Nike ad for Woods is a buzz "hole in one". And everyone wants a piece of it.

  • Apple iPad

    Apple admits some iPad users may have trouble staying connected to the internet, confirming reports from customers who purchased the new devices over the weekend.

  • The Wicked contains five meats (turkey, ham, roast beef, pepperoni and bacon) and three cheeses.

    Sometimes in life, bad things happen. Sometimes, it's not really anyone's fault. But, most of the time, Americans sue.

  • KFC Double Down Sandwich

    The Double Down consists of two fried chicken breasts sandwiching a couple slices of bacon, some cheese, and the Colonel's Sauce.

  • Glassdoor.com conducted a survey which shows employees are more confident they will not lose their jobs. However, three out of four are willing to take a pay cut to make sure. For people who are unemployed, nine out of ten are willing to work for less than they originally expected.

  • ipad_portland.jpg

    It came, it saw, it conquered. Kinda. Apple says it sold more than 300,000 iPads on Saturday (including pre-orders), a million apps were downloaded, along with 250,000 books.

  • KB Homes

    Today I was sent to the Fairmont Miramar Hotel in Santa Monica (nice!) to cover the KB Home annual shareholders meeting. The California homebuilder has had a rough time of it in the housing downturn. Its former CEO, Bruce Karatz, is currently on trial for 20 counts alleging stock options backdating which would put him away for 400 years if convicted.

  • bad_art_2.jpg

    For those who've stood in a museum in front of a bazillion dollar work of modern art and wondered, "That is art?," here is an art museum which may appeal to your sense of humor, if not your sense of taste.

  • Who knew a defense company could be hip? All those guys with slide rules and pocket protectors. I know, I know. It's not like that anymore. Well, not so much.

More From Funny Business with Jane Wells

  • Jane Wells

    Based in Los Angeles, Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com.

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