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CNBC U.S. Contributors

Jane Wells

Jane Wells
Special Correspondent, CNBC

Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com. Based in Los Angeles, she also contributes to CNBC's breaking news coverage.

Wells assumed her current role after more than 20 years as a CNBC reporter. Most recently, she covered retail, agriculture and defense as well as reports on California's economy, West Coast real estate and Las Vegas for the network. Wells joined CNBC in 1996, providing special coverage of the O.J. Simpson civil case for "Rivera Live." During her career at the network, Wells also served as a senior correspondent for CNBC's "Upfront Tonight."

Prior to joining CNBC, she was a correspondent for the Fox News Channel and Los Angeles reporter for NBC's flagship television station, WNBC, in New York. Her television news career includes reporter positions with KTTV, Los Angeles; WTVJ, Miami; and KOB, Albuquerque. She has also contributed international reports for CNN.

Wells has received numerous honors for her work, including a 1992 Peabody Award and duPont Award for her role in the live coverage of the Rodney King Trial. That same year, she earned a Los Angeles Emmy Award for her investigative reporting. She also has received UPI, Press Club and Emmy Awards for feature reporting; three Florida Emmy Awards for news reporting; and the Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for team reporting.

Wells holds bachelor's degrees in broadcast journalism and philosophy from the University of Southern California, where she graduated with honors. She and her husband have two children and live in Los Angeles.

Follow Jane Wells on Twitter @janewells.

More

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    The Long Beach and Los Angeles ports released preliminary figures for May today.

  • The match ball for the opening World Cup fixture between South Africa and Mexico.

    The World Cup is big business ... though not so much in America. Saturday, however, the U.S. men's soccer team takes on England, and I will watch! Ok, I promise to watch for at least ten minutes. To prepare myself for the experience, I've been reading up on the event

  • In what may be a spoof so hilariously on target you'll want to cry, UCBcomedy has imagined what might happen if a cup of coffee spills during an executive meeting at BP headquarters. "Sir, I think we may be underestimating the size of the spill." It goes from bad to worse. Then the Halliburton guys show up.

  • Carly Fiorina and Barbara Boxer

    Carly Fiorina and Barbara Boxer have much to debate as the former CEO of Hewlett-Packard seeks to wrest the U.S. Senate seat away from the veteran Democratic incumbent.

  • The funny business of high school graduation. Thursday night I head to one. I will sit in a football stadium for two hours, which will only seem like three. I promise not to fall asleep, and, if I do, I promise not to do it on camera. Especially if Barack Obama shows up.

  • Daily Diapers

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  • Tony Hayward, BP Group Chief Executive

    "This has not been handled well." That assessment of BP's public relations campaign comes from Mike Sitrick, whose Sitrick & Co. is well known for its crisis management skills.

  • Tony Hayward (L) & Michael Sheen (R)

    It isn't a question of "if" the BP oil spill movie will be made, but when. Since I live in Hollywood, it is my duty to help with casting.

  • Employees line up for a Walmart meeting.

    As I've been reporting today, Wal-Mart announced a $15 billion share repurchase program at its annual shareholder meeting, as 16,000 employees and shareholders gathered Friday at Bud Walton Arena at the University of Arkansas. But, here's what you don't see on TV.

  • Wednesday night was Senior Awards Night at the high school where my son will be graduating next week. My son, like so many young men, was a late bloomer in terms of focus and achievement. But one thing he decided early on was that he wanted to be part of the United States Marine Corps. He has never lost sight of that goal.