Funny Business with Jane Wells

Jane Wells

Jane Wells
Special Correspondent, CNBC

Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com. Based in Los Angeles, she also contributes to CNBC's breaking news coverage.

Wells assumed her current role after more than 20 years as a CNBC reporter. Most recently, she covered retail, agriculture and defense as well as reports on California's economy, West Coast real estate and Las Vegas for the network. Wells joined CNBC in 1996, providing special coverage of the O.J. Simpson civil case for "Rivera Live." During her career at the network, Wells also served as a senior correspondent for CNBC's "Upfront Tonight."

Prior to joining CNBC, she was a correspondent for the Fox News Channel and Los Angeles reporter for NBC's flagship television station, WNBC, in New York. Her television news career includes reporter positions with KTTV, Los Angeles; WTVJ, Miami; and KOB, Albuquerque. She has also contributed international reports for CNN.

Wells has received numerous honors for her work, including a 1992 Peabody Award and duPont Award for her role in the live coverage of the Rodney King Trial. That same year, she earned a Los Angeles Emmy Award for her investigative reporting. She also has received UPI, Press Club and Emmy Awards for feature reporting; three Florida Emmy Awards for news reporting; and the Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for team reporting.

Wells holds bachelor's degrees in broadcast journalism and philosophy from the University of Southern California, where she graduated with honors. She and her husband have two children and live in Los Angeles.

Follow Jane Wells on Twitter @janewells.

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  • secret.jpg

    Generating "buzz" is all the rage!! To succeed these days, you need good word-of-blog. Going "viral" is about infecting people with your particular strain of hype. Exclamation points help!!!

  • Iowa map

    They held up signs bearing the names of countries like Nepal, Moldova, Japan. They were farm families mostly, in the Iowa town of Carroll, and this week they are hosting dozens of foreign ambassadors and diplomats in their homes.

  • Field

    If you and your significant other spent $400 on a meal for two--and had to bring your own dishes--you'd expect something spectacular. And spectacular is what's promised by a roving dining experience called "Outstanding in the Field."

  • Tiger Woods

    Among the firsts in Sunday's PGA Championship was that Tiger Woods, for the first time, did not win a major tournament while in the lead going into Sunday. Another certainty thrown onto the ash heap of golf.

  • As we head into the weekend, two very small examples of "how to stand out in the crowd." But only one, perhaps, succeeds.

  • Meat Card

    There's a fledging company with an outrageously unusual product coming to market. It's business cards...made out of beef jerky.

  • On the heels of my blog about whether or not Wal-Mart wants to be called Wal-Mart, Walmart, or Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., I got an earful about all the other confusing names out there. Is it K-Mart or Kmart? Bank of America-Merrill Lynch...really?

  • Walmart logo comparison

    There's a new rule book of sorts on how to spell the name of the world's largest retailer. Media outlets are being notified by 'Walmart' (Wal-Mart? Wal*Mart?) via an editor's note at the end of news releases

  • Palin XBox

    It was the talk of the web. Even the Atlantic weighed in. Somebody claiming to have a Microsoft Xbox360 autographed by former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin two days before she left office put it up for auction on Ebay...for $1.1 million.

  • California Flag

    Three weeks after reaching a budget deal, California is still short on money. It's still issuing IOUs. The State Controllers Office says that from July 2 through August 7, $1,862,358,782.85 in so-called "registered warrants" have been issued by California in lieu of cash. Of that amount, $369 million has been sent out in August.

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  • Jane Wells

    Based in Los Angeles, Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com.

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