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  • Anti-Gaddafi rebel runs away as smoke rises following an air strike by Libyan warplanes.

    Fears that the world economy is facing another downturn are being overplayed, despite the political upheaval caused by recent unrest in the Middle East and the earthquake and subsequent tsunami in Japan, Jim O'Neill, chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management, said.

  • Sprint Nextel_200.jpg

    Here's what you should be watching Tuesday, March 22.

  • The bears are bound to soon knock stocks down, Cramer said. How to position yourself now.

  • One euro and U.S. dollar

    Investors are so focused on the troubles in Japan and Libya that the euro is just strengthening on the sidelines, this analyst says. But for how long?

  • Markets are "overreacting" to the geopolitical events around the world, including the political unrest in North Africa and the Middle East, and troubles in Japan, said Willem Buiter, chief economist at Citi.

  • Changing Global Outlook

    CNBC's Steve Liesman takes a look at how economists are changing their forecasts in response to recent events.

  • 80-year-old Sumi Abe is rescued from her destroyed house nine days after the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 20, 2011 in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan.

    In the wake of Japan’s cascading disasters, signs of economic loss can be found in many corners of the globe, from Sendai, on the battered Japanese coast, to Paris to Marion, Ark., reports the New York Times.

  • buffett_quick_korea2011_200.jpg

    The Japanese disaster may speed improvement in relations between South Korea and Japan, the mayor of South Korea's third largest city told Warren Buffett today.

  • Customers buy fish on sale at a stall during the new year's first auction at the Tsukiji fish market on January 5, 2010 in Tokyo, Japan. The market handles approx 2,888 tons of fish a day generating over 2.8 billion yen.

    Japan’s list of casualties, already long, could soon include two of the country’s iconic brands: sushi and Kobe beef. The NYT reports.

  • Warren Buffett

    The nuclear disaster in Japan is likely to have major effects on US energy policy, according to billionaire investor Warren Buffett.

  • Auto worker works on assembly line at GM Lansing Grand River plant.

    General Motors is cutting non-essential expenses and travel while it assesses the situation in Japan, a sign the auto industry is unsure how much the earthquake and tsunami may cripple the production of new cars and trucks.

  • Hollywood sign

    Despite the upheaval roiling the markets, Wall Street analysts continue to issue upbeat reports about media companies, and even the negative reports don't mention the headlines — they simply don't have the exposure to Japan and the rest of the market instability as many other sectors.

  • The yen is trading within range of its pre-crisis levels hours after G-7 countries intervened in the markets. Will it last?

  • Yen

    In the wake of the crisis in Japan, the yen has strengthened dramatically, which is counterintuitive. Usually, when a country's economy is expected to weaken, so does its currency, but  Japan is a unique case.

  • 2011 Honda Odyssey

    In the depths of a panic-driven stocks sell-off this week, an options investor was making a big bullish bet on Japanese automaker Honda Motor .

  • Fukushima Daiichi Plant_200.jpg

    Plans to develop new nuclear reactors may have to be put on hold until world leaders assess the causes of Japan's nuclear disaster and how to prevent a repeat of the accident, Luis Echavarri, director of the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency told CNBC.

  • international_business_deal_200.jpg

    The Group of Seven nations have agreed to a secret protocol to guide their coordinated intervention and won’t reveal it in order to keep currency markets guessing, according to people familiar with the matter.

  • dominos_stock_chart_200.jpg

    Japanese stocks are beginning to look cheap, according to Societe Generale Strategist Dylan Grice.

  • Yen coins and banknotes

    The G7’s agreement on joint action to push the yen lower has, so far, had the desired effect, reversing much of this week’s gain for the yen and boosting equities in Tokyo.

  • As the market begins the process of second guessing the G7’s coordinated action to keep the yen lower, High Frequency Economics is warning investors the damage caused by the disaster in Japan is being both understated by the government and underappreciated outside of people in the immediate vicinity.