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  • Mark Fields, president of the Americas for Ford Motor Co., right, and Alan Mulally, the company's president and chief executive officer.

    The big challenge at Ford remains the mounting losses in Europe. They're already more than $500 million this year and could eventually reach $1.5 billion this year.

  • The Toyota logo is displayed on the grill of brand new Toyota RAV4s on the sales lot at City Toyota in Daly City, California.

    After three years filled with recalls, limited supply, and a much needed redesign, the Toyota Camry has become the top selling vehicle in the U.S. Experian Automotive analyzed new vehicle registrations during the first half of this year and found 209,000 new Toyota Camry's in the U.S. compared to 202,000 Ford F-150 pick-up trucks. A year ago, Experian listed the F-150 as number one ahead of the Camry.

  • Chevy Volt

    The folks at GM headquarters are not happy.

  • Wall Street sign

    Lower rates don’t make that much difference anymore, and in between bouts of market volatility, investors can actually get back to stock picking, Dinakar Singh, founder and CEO of TPG-Axon Capital, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Monday.

  • Finding Value in Health Care Stocks

    Dinakar Singh, TPG-Axon Capital CEO, discusses the best way to play the health care space.

  • On August 21, a Chinese fisherman caught a rare fish worth over $475,000. As impressive a haul as that is, it didn’t represent the highest known payday for something caught from the sea.

  • The chief executive of Japanese technology giant Sony promised an “aggressive,” product-focused turnaround in an interview with CNBC.

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    The Department of Transportation and the EPA have locked in the new fuel efficiency rules guiding the industry through 2025.

  • Brazil has a statutory minimum of 30 days for vacation and 11 days for public holidays. Pictured: Ipanema Beach, Rio de Janeiro

    Investing abroad always poses risk but if you’re careful, though, you can profit nicely in overseas markets, some with double-digit year-over-year growth.

  • GLENDALE, CA - JANUARY 05: Hyundai cars are on display in the showroom of the Hyundai dealership on January 5, 2011 in Glendale, California. Hyundai Motor Co. market share in the United States climbed just short of 5% in 2010. United States auto sales rose 11% in December. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

    Hyundai's U.S. plants are close to hitting full capacity, so the Korean automaker can do little to meet strong demand.

  • car_accident_200.jpg

    The U.S. Department of Transportation is launching the biggest study ever done on vehicle-to- vehicle communication in hopes of developing technology that could prevent thousands of crashes.

  • bmw.jpg

    Its DriveNow program has officially launched in San Francisco where board member Ian Robertson believes those living in the city by the bay will embrace having a luxury car ready to rent.

  • A Sony Corp. store

    If companies could compete for Olympic hurdles medals, Japan’s track-tested, shin-bruised manufacturing sector would have fielded some of the most hardened corporate athletes in the recent Games, The Financial Times reports.

  • Used Car Sales Booming

    The subprime auto market continues to churn out strong results for the largest U.S. dealership.

  • Hagia Sofia and Blue Mosque seen from Topkapi Palace in Istanbul, Turkey.

    Turkey’s roaring economy has earned it the nickname “New Tiger” among foreign investors -— who are pouring money into the country.

  • The coal fueled Fiddlers Ferry power station emits vapour into the night sky in Warrington, United Kingdom.

    Ankara’s effort at energy self-sufficiency will mean dishing out big contracts without offending any of its major trade partners.

  • Traders work on the floor of the Istanbul Stock Exchange in Istanbul, Turkey.

    Dominated by a highly-regarded banking sector and flourishing consumer goods industry, Turkey’s stock market is easy for foreign investors to access.

  • global_currency_200.jpg

    Asian government bonds have been seen as somewhat of a safe-haven this year, benefiting from volatile global markets. But some experts argue that the appeal of certain regional bond markets as a longer-term investment is growing, suggesting that that investors won’t rush back into the world’s bigger debt markets in a hurry when risk appetite returns.

  • Maslak is a neighborhood and one of the main business districts of Istanbul, Turkey.

    For years, the prospect of Turkey joining the EU wasn't taken seriously. But Turkey has embarked on a series of economic and political reforms, making it more palatable to EU members.

  • A trader looks worried as he works in a dealing room in Tel Aviv, Israel.

    Stock markets from New York to Tokyo have seen some stellar gains this week amid hopes of further monetary easing globally, but analysts say there’s one thing that investors appear to be forgetting:  economic growth remains weak and is likely to remain so for some time.