Asia Top News and Analysis Japan

More

  • Employees of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant walk outside of the destroyed 4th block of the plant on February 24, 2011 ahead of the 25th anniversary of the meltdown of reactor number four due to be marked on April 26, 2011. Ukraine said early this year it will lift restrictions on tourism around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, formally opening the scene of the world's worst nuclear accident to visitors. Chernobyl's number-four reactor, in what was then the Soviet Union and now Ukraine, expl

    Nuclear safety watchdogs and G20 energy ministers gathering in Paris on Tuesday and Wednesday to work on reinforcing nuclear safety around the globe in the wake of the Japanese nuclear disaster at Fukushima last March were keen to stress nuclear energy is still a viable source of alternative energy.

  • lightning_AP.jpg

    The freakish outbreak of tornadoes could result in the worst 3 months ever for the insurance industry. And with the hurricane season just beginning, 2011 could be a record year for losses.

  • Nuclear Power Plant

    China’s freeze on new nuclear projects could last until the beginning of 2012, according to a senior industry official, underlining the gravity of China’s nuclear safety review. The FT reports.

  • wall_street_sign3_200.jpg

    The US economy can still grow by as much as 2.5 percent this year without a third round of quantitative easing, despite a raft of bad economic data, Rajiv Biswas, chief economist at IHS Global Insight told CNBC on Monday.

  • Dating services and wedding halls report a surge in demand since March’s earthquake and tsunami as many Japanese decide they do not want to be alone in the next crisis. The FT reports.

  • Bernanke Testifies to Congress on U.S. Monetary Policy

    Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke weighs in on the economy Tuesday, and he is expected to acknowledge the recent slowdown but may withhold a view on the duration.

  • Daniel Akerson, Managing Director of The Carlyle Group

    This week General Motors will hold its first annual meeting since coming out of bankruptcy two years ago, and among the flurry of questions about GM one will stand out: Is the new GM a changed company?

  • Out of Work

    "There's a big debate about whether what we're seeing right now is the beginning of a sustained slowdown or just (the effect of) short-term factors," says one chief economist.

  • Japanese policemen wearing a protective suits undergo testing for possible nuclear radiation at screening center about 35 kilometers away from Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant as they finish their duty inside exclusion zone in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.

    Two nuclear plant workers have exceeded Japan's radiation exposure limit for men, and others who toiled without sufficient protection in the earliest days of the crisis could show high levels as well, the government and plant operator said Friday.

  • Chrysler grille

    After almost two years with the federal government owning a sizable chunk of Chrysler, the once bankrupt auto maker is now free and clear of Uncle Sam. Thursday night Chrysler parent Fiat paid $500 million for the U.S. Treasury Department's 6% stake in Chrysler. Now comes the fun part.

  • Resurgence of American Auto Industry

    Insight on the U.S. selling its remaining Chrysler stake to Fiat, with Sergio Marchionne, Chrysler Group CEO and CNBC's Phil LeBeau.

  • car_dealer_handing_keys_200.jpg

    The knee jerk reaction to May auto sales would be dismissing them as irrelevant since it was a strange mix of factors.

  • Steering wheel

    Raised debt ceiling rejected, May auto sales slumped and the LinkedInIPO emulated. Here's what we're watching...

  • Tokyo Airport Power Saving Sign

    Innovative ad campaigns are not only helping to rebuild Japan's energy grid, but are also set to improve the sustainability of a local economy near you. 

  • Beijing, China

    The question now is how much economic growth may slow, before the authorities shift from controlling inflation to revving the growth engine. The NYT reports.

  • car_accident_200.jpg

    The latest set of crash tests by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety show something few would have thought was possible 10 or 15 years ago: several small cars are among the safest on the road. Surprised? Don't be. The results show small cars are benefiting from new technology developed to protect passengers.

  • Souk Waqif at dusk Doha, Qatar.

    The Doha round of negotiations on world trade faces collapse unless world leaders can reach a final agreement to lift trade tarrifs before the end of the year, a new report by the governments of the UK, Germany, Turkey and Indonesia warned on Wednesday.

  • The Tiffany & Co. store in New York City.

    President Obama meets his peers, Tiffany reports earnings after the earthquake and Google jumps into the mobile payment game. Here's what we're watching...

  • Although it hasn't made sense lately, Cramer sees the market making a shift.

  • Has Tide Turned for Markets?

    Mad Money host Jim Cramer sifts through the major business news headlines, including Japan's reconstruction, China's inflation, and more.