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  • aderans_wig.jpg

    The world's largest wigmaker, Aderans, is in Japan. But now the rug is being pulled out from under the domestic toupee market, as more Japanese men reportedly "bare all" up top. Aderans is so afraid of a hostile takeover it's seeking a sort of "poison pill" defense, an effort being fought by its largest shareholder, American investment fund Steel Partners. Steel Partners says the plan isn't good for growth, and a hairy shareholder vote is looming.

  • Japanese wholesale prices grew more than expected in April from a year earlier on a recent pick-up in oil prices, with markets viewing the data as keeping the Bank of Japan on track for a rate increase later this year.

  • Japan's Financial Services Agency said on Tuesday it will begin monitoring hedge funds operating in Japan, seeking to ward off potential turmoil in financial markets.

  • Theodore Bigman, a portfolio manager at Morgan Stanley, told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” that Asia’s real estate market is strong and rising.

  • The Bank of Japan left its monetary policy unchanged at a board meeting on Friday, keeping the overnight call rate target at 0.5% as widely expected by financial markets. The decision by the nine-member board was unanimous.

  • Japan's trade surplus with the rest of the world grew 73.9% in March, a faster-than-expected increase largely led by strong auto and semiconductor exports, the government said Wednesday.

  • 2007 Toyota Camry

    The news out of Tokyo that Toyota eclipsed General Motors in 1Q sales is likely to elicit the usual round of "Detroit is dying" stories in the media. However, this news is not a surprise and does not mean Detroit is dead. Are the Big Three struggling to find their way domestically and globally? You bet.

  • Citigroup takeover target Nikko Cordial reported a 38% increase in quarterly net profit on Tuesday as a beneficial change in its tax status compensated for a decline in underlying earnings.

  • Four members of Japan's top economic council on Tuesday suggested merging the Tokyo Stock Exchange and the country's commodities exchanges, a move aimed at boosting Tokyo's competitiveness as an investment hub.

  • Hi folks. Here are our trivia questions for today. The video is worth $2,000 Bonus Bucks: Today, the Yen hit all time lows against what major currency? And the news question is worth $1,000 Bonus Bucks: Citigroup unveiled a new restructuring plan this morning that will eliminate how many jobs? Remember, go to the contest home page and click on the Bonus Bucks tab on the left hand navigation to select your answers.

  • Machinery orders at Japanese firms fell more than expected in February from the previous month, data showed on Wednesday, but did little to change the view that the strength in corporate investment remains firm.

  • Machinery orders at Japanese firms fell more than expected in February from the previous month, data showed on Wednesday, but did little to change the view that the strength in corporate investment remains firm.

  • Hey folks, here are today's trivia questions for those extra investing bucks. the video is worth $2,000 Bonus Bucks: The Bank of Japan left interest rates unchanged today. What is the current rate? And the news is worth $1,000 Bonus Bucks: Citigroup is purchasing hedge fund Old Lane Capital for how much?

  • Bank of Japan left monetary policy unchanged as widely expected on Tuesday, keeping the overnight call rate target at 0.50% for two months in a row after its rate hike in February.

  • Pentax is expected to scrap a planned share-swap merger with Hoya at a board meeting onTuesday, a senior company official said, raising speculation that Hoya may suspend its plan to make a tender offer for the camera and medical equipment maker.

  • Shares of Pentax jumped 7% after Hoya said it would make a tender offer for the Japanesecamera and medical equipment maker, but it remains unclear whether the bid will succeed with Pentax's board split and its president set to resign.

  • The Bank of Japan starts a two-day monetary policy meeting on Monday, with board members seen putting their heads together to prepare for an economic outlook report due later this month.

  • Rod Smyth, chief investment strategist for Wachovia Securities, told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” that some overseas stocks offer greater growth prospects than their U.S. counterparts.“I think the most important thing that investors have to get their mind around is simply this: Is there going to be a recession in the next couple of years?” Smyth said Thursday. “We know the economy is slowing down. History tells us mid-cycle slowdowns are very good for stocks and that recessions are bad for stocks. If you can get your mind around the fact that we’re in a mid-cycle slowdown then you want to put money to work.”

  • Japanese companies are slightly less optimistic about business conditions than they were three months ago, the Bank of Japan's March tankan survey showed on Monday.

  • HSBC Holdings is set to launch retail banking operations in Japan early next year and plans to open as many as 50 branches within four years, the Financial Times reported on Friday.