Currencies Japanese Yen

  • Jean-Claude Trichet

    The crisis in Japan following the devastating earthquake and tsunami that killed thousands of people will not have an effect on the European Central Bank's interest rate policy, Manfred Schepers, vice-president finance and chief financial officer for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, told CNBC.

  • Heavy-machinery company Deere still sees itself doubling in size over the next eight years, due in large part to construction and agriculture in Asia, the corporation’s CEO, Samuel Allen, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Shares in Tokyo dropped following the deadly March 11 earthquake and tsunami

    That sound of pounding hooves you’ve been hearing is of investors entering Japan, not leaving the disaster-ravaged country, which has become an unlikely darling for fund money.

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    Crises like those in Japan and the Middle East shouldn't be any threat to the dollar, this analyst says.

  • A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    The G7 intervened to weaken the Yen last Friday in an attempt to stabilize the Japanese currency’s dramatic rise since the catastrophic earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster. Europe’s central banks, the Federal Reserve and the Bank of Canada followed the Bank of Japan’s Yen sales, pushing it down against the US dollar.

  • Anti-Gaddafi rebel runs away as smoke rises following an air strike by Libyan warplanes.

    Fears that the world economy is facing another downturn are being overplayed, despite the political upheaval caused by recent unrest in the Middle East and the earthquake and subsequent tsunami in Japan, Jim O'Neill, chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management, said.

  • Risk-on investors are back in action, and the euro is riding high — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • 80-year-old Sumi Abe is rescued from her destroyed house nine days after the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 20, 2011 in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan.

    In the wake of Japan’s cascading disasters, signs of economic loss can be found in many corners of the globe, from Sendai, on the battered Japanese coast, to Paris to Marion, Ark., reports the New York Times.

  • Looking at the pure economic ties between Japan and the UK for instance, it's hard to justify why UK stocks should fall so heavily.

  • Dollars and Yen

    The G-7's intervention has halted the yen's rise, but what happens next isn't clear. Here's how to trade.

  • The yen is trading within range of its pre-crisis levels hours after G-7 countries intervened in the markets. Will it last?

  • Yen

    In the wake of the crisis in Japan, the yen has strengthened dramatically, which is counterintuitive. Usually, when a country's economy is expected to weaken, so does its currency, but  Japan is a unique case.

  • Fukushima nuclear power plant shown on March 15, 2011 following earthquake and tsunami, Japan, Tokyo Electric Power Co.

    There is no way to underscore the depth of the tragedy we see playing out before us as the potential of a nuclear nightmare of unprecedented proportions unfolds before our eyes. And while it pales in comparison to the human toll, the Japanese economy is also surely facing a period of great challenge.

  • The yen is settling into a range after coordinated intervention by G-7 countries, but there's plenty of excitement elsewhere — it's time for your FX Fix.

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    The G7 gang is moving in and markets are reacting.

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    The Group of Seven nations have agreed to a secret protocol to guide their coordinated intervention and won’t reveal it in order to keep currency markets guessing, according to people familiar with the matter.

  • Yen coins and banknotes

    The G7’s agreement on joint action to push the yen lower has, so far, had the desired effect, reversing much of this week’s gain for the yen and boosting equities in Tokyo.

  • As the market begins the process of second guessing the G7’s coordinated action to keep the yen lower, High Frequency Economics is warning investors the damage caused by the disaster in Japan is being both understated by the government and underappreciated outside of people in the immediate vicinity.

  • Knee-jerk reactions to catastrophes often fall wide of the mark, Stephen King, chief economist at HSBC told CNBC.

  • Japanese 10,000 Yen bank notes

    Here's what you should be watching Friday, March 18.