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Currencies Japanese Yen

  • Calm is more or less prevailing in the currency markets, but don't expect that to last, these analysts say.

  • As investors fret about a default of Greece’s $300 billion debt bill, consider this: at $10.2 trillion, the Japanese bond market is the largest government debt market on the planet. And Hedge fund manager Kyle Bass, who made his first fortune betting against subprime mortgages, is now wagering that this market will collapse—soon.

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    The mantra on the lips of many Japanese chief executives these days is “overseas expansion”. With a shrinking domestic market due to a rapidly deteriorating demographic profile, they are keen to find new opportunities abroad. The FT reports.

  • RBC Capital Markets reveals which financial institutions could soon up their dividend. The "Fast Money" traders weigh in.

  • Japanese Yen

    Two Japanese shipbuilders have called for urgent government action to tackle what they say is the unfair advantage enjoyed by South Korean rivals from an artificially cheap currency. The FT reports.

  • New York Stock Exchange, lower Manhattan, New York City.

    U.S. economic reports should dominate early trading Thursday, unless the European debt crisis bubbles up again.

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    December chain store sales and weekly jobless claims top the list of what traders will be watching Thursday.

  • Commodities traders at the New York Mercantile Exchange.

    The hot commodities trade caught a chill Tuesday and could continue to struggle in the short term as some excess is wrung from the markets.

  • New York Stock Exchange

    Stocks cross into 2011 with a positive tilt, but the December jobs report and other data will put investor faith in the recovery to the test in the very first week of the year.

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    The dollar is closing out December near its lows for the month, but odds are good that it will see a rebound in January.

  • The Nissan Leaf

    Nissan is planning to shift the balance of its production and support functions towards dollar-linked economies, including the U.S. and China, to protect itself against currency volatility, the Japanese carmaker’s chief executive has said. The FT reports.

  • The euro could be set to rally to its high of last year against the dollar of $1.52, Royce Tostrams, technical analyst at Tostrams Groep, told CNBC Friday.

  • Sheet of US one hundred dollar bills

    The Federal Reserve launched a controversial new policy on Wednesday, committing to buy $600 billion more in government bonds by the middle of next year in an attempt to breathe new life into a struggling U.S. economy.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    The Federal Reserve is about to take a huge risk in hopes of getting the economy steaming along again. Nobody is sure it will work, and it may actually do damage.

  • The Dow Jones Industrial Average has no real chance of going higher in the near term if the VIX index shows increased volatility, Chris Zwermann, global strategist at Zwermann Financial, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • The "Mad Money" host explains how a lower dollar could help the US out of a weak economy.

  • Fears of a "currency war," in which countries devalue their currencies to gain a trade advantage, dominated headlines last week ahead of the weekend meetings in South Korea of the finance ministers from the 20 leading economies that make up the Group of 20 (G-20).

  • Nouriel Roubini

    The European Central Bank should worry less about the “phantom risk” of inflation and instead focus on the rising threat of deflation which could result from a currency war, economist Nouriel Roubini said in an article for Roubini Global Economics clients.

  • The euro is likely to continue its rise against the dollar in the long term, but investors should watch out for setbacks in the near term, Royce Tostrams, technical analyst at Tostrams Groep, told CNBC Friday.

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    Japan is cutting interests rates to virtually zero. This means investments in Japanese debt are as good as putting your money under your mattress; the money will likely still be there but when you get your yen back, don't expect any rate of return. What could be worse, purchasing power is likely to be impacted even with minimal inflation. Japanese drama continues.