×

Politics John McCain

  • graphic_fast_money.jpg

    With the Democratic Convention underway, we can’t help but wonder which stocks should win in November?

  • graphic_fast_money.jpg

    Who’s more likely to win in November, McCain or Obama? If history is any indication...

  • obama_mccain_together.jpg

    Presidential election years are usually good for stocks, no matter which party wins, while the market’s performance in the three months prior to the November vote is a reliable indicator of which candidate wins.

  • 080826 Obama McCain.jpg

    With the Democratic National Convention starting yesterday, the conversation over which candidate will be better for the economy will heat up.  Here are some stats on the Dow and presidential elections. With the exception of FDR's takeover for Herbert Hoover, it looks like "Change" seems to be less favorable to the markets than continuity when a Republican is in office. The best year for the Dow, on the other hand, occurred under a Democrat's administration.

  • White House

    Both presidential candidates support the need to curb greenhouse gases believed to cause global warming, but there are key differences in how they would implement what will eventually be a significant overhaul of the country’s energy infrastructure.

  • Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

    Democrats open their national convention Monday to formally nominate Barack Obama for president, but the party's unity theme faces a dangerous challenge from a key constituency — the one-quarter of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's backers still angry she lost and who vow not to vote for the party standard-bearer in November.

  • Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, Jill Biden, and Joe Biden

    Barack Obama's choice of Joe Biden as a running mate sets the bar for his Republican rival John McCain, who could use his own pugnacious No. 2 to deliver attack lines and a solid debate performance.

  • graphic_fast_money.jpg

    With the election heating up, investors can’t help but wonder which candidate will boost their portfolio?

  • John McCain and Barack Obama say they are agreeing to hold three presidential debates and one vice presidential debate this fall.

  • John McCain and Barack Obama

    Republican candidate John McCain has pulled closer to Democrat Barack Obama in the 2008 presidential race, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.

  • With VP nominations imminent as the Presidential race heats up, how are the Intrade Political Futures markets (www.intrade.com) reacting to the candidates' short list?

  • National party conventions are known as much for their nonstop partying as they are for their politics — a time for lobbyists, politicians and corporate executives to gather at lavish receptions and elegant dinners.

  • Barack Obama

    American voters should know this week who will join Barack Obama as No. 2 on the Democratic presidential ballot, a critical decision for the first-term senator who is fighting off Republican John McCain's bid to paint him as untested and unready for the White House.

  • obama_supporters_young_1.jpg

    Television networks are assigning reporters to a new beat this election year: people who don’t watch the evening news. With polls showing a surge in primary-season ballots cast by voters under 30, media outlets are out to convert the newly energized voters into viewers.

  • obama_mccain_together.jpg

    After a handshake and the briefest of embraces in a church full of evangelical Christians, Democrat Barack Obama quickly took off the gloves and was again battering John McCain as little different from President George W. Bush.

  • John McCain and Barack Obama

    They are both viewed as positives for generics because they endorse getting their drugs to market faster and also would favor including them as part of trade agreements in developing countries.

  • mccain_med_200x175.jpg

    John McCain raised $27 million in July, his largest one-month fundraising haul since clinching the Republican presidential nomination, while the Republican National Committee brought in nearly $26 million.

  • Will John McCain turn Tsar Putin’s invasion of Georgia into a drill, drill, drill issue? He should. It will throw Democrats even more on the defensive--especially Sen. Obama whose weak response to Putin’s neo-Soviet actions have already put him way behind the eight ball on Russia.

  • Boeing Headquarters

    The chances are "pretty good" that Boeing is truly considering the threat, because the new Pentagon request from bidders contains two things--a tanker ready next year, and a larger aircraft--which are both "bad for Boeing."

  • Nearly two-thirds of Americans (64 percent) support offshore oil drilling, according to a new Rasmussen poll. And 42 percent say offshore oil drilling would have the biggest impact in terms of reducing oil prices. Only 20 percent of Americans now oppose offshore drilling.