Politics John McCain

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    Suddenly the Democratic presidential primary race is teetering on the edge--not just between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, but between boon or disaster for the party’s 2008 hopes. So far, the clash between two history-making candidacies has only helped. In state after state, Democrats displayed their enthusiasm through robust primary turnouts that drew in many new voters.

  • If the presumtive Republican presidential nominee takes the White House, these contractors stand to the gain the most.

  • CNBC asked several people what impact the three remaining candidates would have on the economy--and markets--if they land in the White House.

  • Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

    Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton defeated Senator Barack Obama in the Ohio and Texas primaries on Tuesday, ending a string of defeats and allowing her to soldier on in a Democratic presidential nomination race that now seems unlikely to end any time soon.

  • Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

    Hillary Clinton refused to count herself out of the U.S. presidential race on Tuesday as her hard-fought duel with Barack Obama for the Democratic nomination rested with voters in Ohio and Texas.

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    If Sen. John McCain wants to run as a candidate of change, and if he’s truly interested in distancing himself from President Bush, he should reverse the declining fortunes of the Bush wartime dollar. America's prestige is on the line. Right now the greenback is in virtual freefall.

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    On the eve of the make-or-break Texas-Ohio primaries for Sen. Hillary Clinton, she remains in first place in at least one "poll." The Center for Responsive Politics has updated its list of top pharmaceuticals/health products-industry money recipients based on the most recent campaign finance reports and the former First Lady edges out Sen. Barack Obama...

  • We’re starting something new on Political Capital: periodically I will post and answer some of your emails. Here’s a selection of what I’ve received in recent days. Keep those notes coming.

  • Some interesting insights from Peter Wehner on last night’s Kudlow & Company. Mr. Wehner worked in the Reagan and both Bush administrations. He is now senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center.

  • Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

    Democrats Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton clashed sharply over health care in a debate on Tuesday, accusing each other of misrepresenting their approaches to offering coverage for 47 million uninsured Americans.

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    According to The Center for Responsive Politics' web site Pfizer Chairman and CEO Jeff Kindler has opened his wallet again for Sen. Hillary Clinton. You can see his latest "give" here. Twice now within the past year Kindler has given the maximum amount ($2,300) an individual can contribute to a candidate.

  • Presidential Candidate, John McCain

    I had a particular interest in today’s page one New York Times story on John McCain because I write for the newspaper in addition to my day job in television. The story created an immediate sensation as soon as it was released electronically, taking over cable TV political shows last night and dominating morning shows on cable and broadcast networks alike.

  • Senator John McCain presidential ambitions attracted new scrutiny as revealations of his close ties to a lobbyist emerged.

  • John McCain and his political advisor John Weaver (left).

    John McCain denied a romantic relationship with a female telecommunications lobbyist on Thursday and said a report by The New York Times suggesting favoritism for her clients is "not true."

  • Barack Obama

    John McCain accomplished his goal in Wisconsin’s Republican primary, defeating Mike Huckabee across the board, winning among conservatives, and shifting the GOP’s focus toward the general election. But Hillary Clinton did not.

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    Before the polls even opened in Wisconsin on Tuesday, the two Democratic contenders had moved on to campaign in Texas and Ohio, the two next big prizes on the primary calendar.

  • Barack Obama

    With big wins in hand, Democrat Barack Obama pointed on Wednesday toward critical showdowns with rival Hillary Clinton next month that could prove decisive in their heavyweight presidential battle.

  • A "futures market" reading from Rasmussen Reports projects presidential election winners based on "trades" made by the site's users.

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    I blogged on Monday about the pattern of support that Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton have attracted in Democratic nomination contests up to now. The key to breaking the deadlock of their close race is breaking that pattern. Has that now happened?

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    Intrade has done an excellent job of predicting election results over the last few years.  But now a little backlash has begun.