Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.



    Despite the fact that the Los Angeles Times reported today that "Google is in preliminary talks to buy online video pioneer Hulu," a number of sources very close to the negotiations tell me that all talks are "very preliminary" and it is "impossible to characterize anyone as being in the lead."

  • zynga_2_200.jpg

    Social game company Zynga has finally filed for an IPO to raise $1 billion, which may be one of the biggest IPOs of the year. As CNBC reported earlier this week, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs are the company's lead underwriters, with Merrill Lynch, Barclays and Allen & Co. also participating.

  • myspace_logo_new_200.jpg

    Specific Media is a successful ad platform—why on earth would it want to get involved in the money-losing sinkhole that is MySpace? That's exactly the question I asked SpecificMedia's CEO Tim Vanderhook on CNBC today.

  • Bringing MySpace Back

    Discussing how it plans to compete in the social media businesss, with Tim Vanderhook, Specific Media CEO and CNBC's Julia Boorstin.

  • Zynga: Threat to Game Giants?

    CNBC's Julia Boorstin reports how the gaming site could shake up the entire online game industry when it files for an IPO later today.

  • 3D audience

    Paramount is wasting no time driving moviegoers to 3-D screenings of "Transformers: Dark of the Moon." Director Michael Bay has been personally campaigning to draw moviegoers to the new format, by communicating directly with fans and campaigning for theater chains to project the film with more light.

  • myspace_logo_new_200.jpg

    News Corp is finally selling MySpace. The media conglomerate has struck a deal to sell the struggling social network to ad network Specific Media for between $30 million and $40 million.

  • California's Red Light Camera Pain

    CNBC's Julia Boorstin reports law enforcement officials in Los Angeles want to pull down traffic cameras because they are not cost effective.

  • Grand Theft Auto IV

    Videogame makers won a victory at the U.S. Supreme Court today, lifting the threat of a potential crackdown that's been looming over the industry since 2005.

  • Cars 2

    Today Disney opens 'Cars 2' in over 4,100 theaters, making it Pixar's widest-ever launch. There's little question that the film will win the U.S. box office this weekend — it's expected to gross $50 to $55 million. But that's less than the first 'Cars' film...but the movie is just one tiny piece of 'Cars' importance to Disney's bottom line.

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