Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

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  • AT&T

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  • The New York Times building.

    The three subscription options are designed to create a new revenue stream while protecting the websites traffic and ad revenue. The new pay model gives NYTimes.com readers 20 free articles a month before asking them to pick a subscription plan.

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    Despite the upheaval roiling the markets, Wall Street analysts continue to issue upbeat reports about media companies, and even the negative reports don't mention the headlines — they simply don't have the exposure to Japan and the rest of the market instability as many other sectors.

  • Groupon

    Groupon has built a billion dollar business around selling small businesses' daily deals, but its big national deals Gap and Nordstroms that really put the service on the map. Groupon is now teaming up with Lionsgate's to sell tickets to "The Lincoln Lawyer," which opens this weekend.

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  • Darren_Rovells_NFL_lockout_200.jpg

    We're in day three of the NFL Lockout and media giants — and Wall Street analysts — are starting to tally the impact of the shutdown. Billions of dollars are at stake. The biggest advertisers spent a total of $3.4 billion on NFL games this past season and NFL games are the linchpin of ad campaigns for everything from beer and cars, to financial services to electronics.

  • Once again, Twitter is proving a crucial tool for people around the world to communicate and connect. Fast on the heels of protests in the Middle East organized with the help of Twitter, now the communication is all about the 8.9-magnitude earthquake and following tsunami in Japan.

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