Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.


  • After three months of bidding, Warner Music was finally sold to Access Industries' Len Blavatnik for $3.3 billion. Blavatnik, a Russian billionaire with a taste for deal-making is paying a premium of about a third over WMG's average share price, which is certainly good for investors.

  • Electronic Arts Headquarters, Redwood City, California

    On strong growth of digital revenue, Electronic Arts reported strong earnings and beat expectations, sending its stock to a 52-week high. I sat down with CEO John Riccitiello in an exclusive interview about the company's strategy.

  • News Corp.'s headquarters in New York.

    Unlike many of the other media giants this quarter, News Corp did not surprise to the upside. Its earnings and revenue were lower than last year and fell short of Wall Street expectations.

  • The Time Warner building.

    This acquisition is significant for its home entertainment strategy, which is focused on driving more digital sales of movies, and speaks to the direction that all the studios will likely be moving.

  • In Comcast's first quarter since acquiring a majority stake in NBC Universal, CNBC's parent, the cable and media giant beat expectations. The cable division continues to draw more, higher-value subscribers, despite growing competition. NBC Universal reported far more granular numbers than it did when it was wholly owned by GE, and as expected, the cable networks thrived while the broadcast network continued to struggle.

  • CBS

    CBS blew past expectations, with net income growing more than five fold, on double digit increases in advertising, its NCAA March Madness deal, and stronger results from the company's non-advertising businesses.

  • HBO

    Today HBO officially launched its new app, HBO Go, to allow HBO subscribers to access its content from anywhere. Ben Swinburne, Morgan Stanley's media analyst, says this could be a win-win-win — helping Time Warner grow its subscriber base, enabling cable and satellite TV companies to hold on to their subscribers, and giving consumers more access to content.

  • Twitter

    Osama Bin Laden's death proved a huge boost to Twitter — driving unprecedented traffic. The stats are stunning — Twitter just announced that last night saw the highest sustained rate of Tweets ever — an average of 3,000 per second from 10:45 pm EST to 2:20 am EST.

  • Osama bin Laden

    The big news that Osama Bin Laden was finally dead wasn't reported first by a cable or broadcast TV channel, nor by a news wire or newspaper. Twitter broke the news, long before anyone even knew what the news was, when IT consultant who lived in the vicinity of Bin Laden's compound complained about the noise.

  • James Murdoch, son of Rupert Murdoch and Chairman and Chief Executive of News Corporation, Europe and Asia.

    Eighty year old Rupert Murdoch will leave some very big shoes to fill whenever he leaves his post as CEO of News Corp. He's the ultimate media mogul, building a news and entertainment empire piece by piece, through acquisition and organic growth. So who's next in line for the throne?

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