Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

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  • AT&T

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    CEO Reed Hastings has done it again: Netflix bested Wall Street expectations in the third quarter, adding 1.932 million subscribers in the quarter.

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    It's day five of negotiations between Cablevision and Fox and if they don't come to a resolution soon it means NO WORLD SERIES for New York and Philadelphia fans.

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    A new report reveals how Wall Street is moving and shaking on Twitter and Facebook. Financial services' social media activity has exploded over the past two years, according to a new report.

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    A new report finds that social media has a huge impact on buying habits. A full 45 percent of consumers check with friends on the likes of Facebook before they buy.

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    As News Corp's negotiations with Cablevision drag out through a fourth day, the cable company's three million customers in the tri-state area are increasingly frustrated about missing out on football. That means a big win for Verizon's FiOS fiber optic system, which is available to the very same area that's suffering with Cablevision right now.

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  • With just eight hours before Cablevision Fox's contract expires, Cablevision made a dramatic push to keep Fox's channels on the air.

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