Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Residents turn out to vote in mid-term elections at a polling place inside a luxury car dealer in Beverly Hills, California.

    Ads for Republican presidential hopefuls are just starting to hit the airwaves in battleground states, kicking off what will be the most expensive election in history.

  • Zynga just filed a new, expanded S-1, revealing new third-quarter numbers. The filing may be nearly 500 pages longer than the last one, but it's missing a key piece of information — a stock price. That indicates that Zynga's road show, which was scheduled to start next week, has been delayed.

  • Groupon

    If Groupon's been plagued by a slew of questions about its business model and accounting issues? It's more than just pent-up demand and interest in the Internet space. The company has a few tricks up its sleeve to keep consumers.

  • Groupon

    Groupon stock may pop after the IPO, but the company faces a host of challenges beyond the accounting issues that forced the company to re-issue its S-1. Competitors, deal fatigue, customer annoyance and small business frustration are all taking their toll on the company. In the third quarter growth of the number of Groupons sold slowed to just one percent. Back in Q4 of 2010 the growth rate of Groupons sold was 97 percent, according to industry tracker Yipit.

  • Groupon's Big Competition

    CNBC's Julia Boorstin reports Groupon is getting set for its IPO, but there are a slew of competitors nipping at its heels.

  • News Corporation

    Following the media company trend this week, News Corp. reported better than expected earnings and revenues in its fiscal first quarter. The one segment that suffered was its scandal-plagued publishing unit, which reported a 38 percent drop in operating income.

  • AOL

    AOL stock is flying higher today on stronger-than-expected 8 percent global advertising growth. I snagged CEO Tim Armstrong in a 'First on CNBC" interview to hear his strategy to turn the company around.

  • We're headed into a slew of earnings this week from media giants—on both the content and distribution side. Whether we're talking about content creators like News Corp and Time Warner or kings of distribution like Comcast and Time Warner Cable, there are a couple key themes that will impact the whole industry. Here's what to watch as earnings reports roll out this week and next.

  • Inside Google's $100M Bet

    Google will launch 100 channels on YouTube over the next year, reports CNBC's Julia Boorstin.

  • youtube_new_logo.jpg

    It's been in the works for years, and later today YouTube will finally announce the creation of 100 new online YouTube channels with original programming. The tech giant spent months working with Hollywood agencies and has secured deals with celebrities including Ashton Kutcher, Amy Poehler, and Deepak Chopra. Most of these channels will launch next year, creating about 25 hours of new programming per day.

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