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Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • best_buy_logo.jpg

    At the Best Buy in Burbank, Calif., on Black Friday, TVs were certainly a hot seller but a variety of other items were also flying off the shelves, including videogame consoles and tablet computers.

  • Holiday gift and ornaments

    Forget about the newspaper circular. If consumers are looking for Black Friday deals, chances are, they'll look where they spend a ton of time: Facebook. This year more than ever Facebook is a key tool for retailers to connect with shoppers. And this year big brands aren't just trying to get fans to buy, they're trying to spread their message to fans *friends* -- to leverage the site for the power of its networks.

  • Disney and YouTube

    Consumers just got yet another option for entertaining their kids with Disney movies. Disney just agreed to rent its movies on YouTube -- it will offer hundreds of films from Disney, Pixar, and DreamWorks Studios on YouTube starting today for between $1.99 and $3.99. The studio controls pricing and will receive the majority of revenue.

  • Pandora trader wearing single symbol P on his jacket at the NYSE

    I just got off the phone with Pandora CEO Joe Kennedy, moments after the Internet radio company reported record, better-than-expected earnings. He stressed that Pandora's focus on the radio market is working, and the slew of competition from everyone from Spotify to Google isn't hurting one bit.

  • watching_tv_200.jpg

    The "November Sweeps" period -- when ratings set local affiliates ad rates -- ends Wednesday. But this year the buzz on Madison Avenue is about how little sweeps matter. Yes, local affiliates still certainly matter -- they account for north of $20 billion in advertising revenue, with just under $10 billion of that based on sweeps, according to Horizon Media's Brad Adgate. But, with the growth of cable, not to mention the impact of DVRs, logging real-time viewing in a Nielsen diary seems antiquated.

  • twilight_cast_200.jpg

    Teenage girls just can't get enough vampire melodrama. The fourth and second to last movie in the 'Twilight' series opens Friday, and it's already getting throngs of obsessive "twi-hards" to open their wallets.

  • Google

    As expected, Google unveiled its Music store and the expansion of its cloud service—it's pulling out all the stops to compete with the leader, Apple's iTunes. Google has three of the four music labels on board—Sony, Universal, and EMI—all but Warner Music. Now consumers will be able to purchase millions of songs via music.google.com and through the Android market, with 90 second free previews.

  • google-music-invite2.jpg

    On Wednesday afternoon Google will finally launch its long-awaited music store at an event in Los Angeles.

  • cinderella_castle_AP.jpg

    Just moments after Disney reported better-than expected results I sat down with CEO Bob Iger to hear his outlook.

  • Upside Ahead for Disney?

    Insight on Disney earnings, and what lies ahead, with CNBC's Julia Boorstin & John Carney, and David Bank, RBC Capital Markets.

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