Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Twitter

    I caught up with the CEO of Twitter from the annual Advertising Week conference in Manhattan; he tells us demand for Twitter's ads is far outpacing the company's supply. Williams says that not only are more companies looking to advertise on Twitter, but each company also wants to spend more on ads.

  • AOL

    We caught up with AOL CEO Tim Armstrong at Advertising Week where he's pitching his new "Devil Ads" platform. The new Devil ads are bigger and more interactive, with more video —Armstrong says he expects them to be far more effective.

  • TV

    After years of moaning about the death of broadcast TV as viewers move online and to cable, the broadest business is looking pretty healthy.

  • Mark Zuckerberg

    Zuckerberg is a product of public schools and the elite Phillips Exeter Academy, but none of his schooling took place in New Jersey. So why Newark? Why now?

  • blockbuster_AP.jpg

    Blockbuster failed to update its brick-and-mortar model to compete in the fast-paced digital age, and it's been trounced by Netflix and Redbox.

  • family watching tv

    Goldman Sachs' Communacopia hosted some major media CEOs Wednesday afternoon: the mood was upbeat with advertising on the rebound. They also had plenty to say about the value of content — and protecting that content — in the new digital landscape.

  • comcast_sign_200.jpg

    Despite plenty of talk about consumers ditching their cable service, Angelakis says he's not concerned about customers "cutting the cord."

  • AOL

    AOL CEO Tim Armstrong took the stage at Goldman Sachs' Communacopia conference and made a few headlines about his plans to create a next-generation digital content company.

  • The New York Times building.

    The New York Times' new forecast for the third quarter is grim, and investors aren't happy -- the stock is now off nearly 5 percent. CEO Janet Robinson spoke at the Goldman Sachs Communacopia conference, sharing the company's new, more negative outlook, and talked about the company's direction, and the fact that the company is straddling its print past and its digital future.

  • Goldman Sachs annual media and technology conference — Communacopia — kicked off today with optimism and bullish comments from AT&T's CEO Randall Stephenson and Disney CEO Bob Iger. The event is a who's who of media, tech and telecom CEOs; the economy is top of mind, as is digital distribution and the growing smart phone and tablet market.

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