Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Netflix shares have gained a whopping 185 percent over the past 12 months, but the stock is off from its all-time high it hit recently, now facing analyst downgrades and a slew of changes to the media landscape.

  • laptop_nighttime_200.jpg

    As online breaches continue to rise, new companies aiming to guarantee that customers' data is secure are springing up, thanks to the investments of entrepreneurs and venture capitalists who are pouring tens of millions of dollars into tech startups.

  • facebook_friends_200.jpg

    Facebook's long-awaited addition of the ability to "check in" could be a game changer for the social network's revenue stream.

  • lock_laptop.jpg

    Tech and media giants face a delicate balance between privacy and profits. They rely on consumers' personal information to grow revenue, but if consumers don't feel safe — or if their data is stolen — that's a major problem.

  • AOL

    AOL is placing a major bet on the local news market — announcing today that it's expanding its Patch hyper-local news sites to 500 markets around the US. And, for a change, this is great news for the news profession.

  • Julia Roberts in Eat, Pray, Love.

    Hollywood loves an established fan-base, and that's exactly what the 9 million people who bought best-seller "Eat, Pray, Love" are.

  • Google

    Today's news that Google is partnering with DirecTV to sell ads for cable networks could have far-reaching implications for Google and the ad business. This could be a win-win-win for Google, DirecTV, as well as advertisers, and it has the potential to shake up Madison Avenue.

  • Disney beat Wall Street expectations, posting higher-than-expected revenue and earnings on strength at its media networks and a turnaround at its movie studio.

  • TV

    A new report out today from Veronis Suhler Stevenson forecasts spending on media and communications will outpace economic growth as consumers invest in mobile and web access and companies pay to reach them there.

  • Cinderella's Castle

    When Disney reports after the bell Wall Street will be looking for what the media giant can tell us about the strength of the American consumer.

Contact Media

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    Please choose a subscription

    Please enter a valid email address
    Get these newsletters delivered to your inbox, and more info about about our products and service. Privacy Policy.