Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

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    It makes sense: if people are dropping the lowest-tier cable service because it's too expensive, give them a cheaper option. That's what Time Warner Cable is experimenting with now: it'll test a less expensive TV package called "TV Essentials" targeting lower income consumers.

  • Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

    The book isn't quite tailored for the CNBC audience, is that it doesn't talk much about his varied businesses: running Def Jam or striking a $150 million deal with Live Nation. But if the book mirrors his music's success atop the Billboard charts, then Jay-Z stands to cash in.

  • Amazon.com

    The movie business is notoriously fickle, expensive and challenging, to say the least. But Amazon spacer is jumping right in to what it sees as a totally new opportunity — leveraging the power of "aggregated opinions" to cull the best ideas to submit to Hollywood. Amazon just launched "Amazon Studios" — the new site invites amateur screenwriters and filmmakers to submit screenplays or home-made movies, which they're calling 'test films.'

  • Jay-Z Decoded book

    The book isn't quite tailored for the CNBC audience, is that it doesn't talk much about his varied businesses: running Def Jam or striking a $150 million deal with Live Nation. But if the book mirrors his music's success atop the Billboard charts, then Jay-Z stands to cash in.

  • Google CEO Eric Schmidt kicked off the Web 2.0 Summit with a cautious interview. He chose his words carefully and footnoted his jokes, especially when it came to controversial topics like privacy.

  • Facebook

    Today, Facebook unveiled what it's calling a "modern messaging system" which aims to make digital communication "seamless, informal, immediate, personal."

  • Comcast

    Comcast is bringing "TV Everywhere" mobile. The cable giant just announced a new Xfinity TV app, to allow digital TV subscribers to watch TV and program their DVRs, first on Apple's iPad and iPhone, with versions coming for Android devices later this year.

  • Marc Andreessen

    Since the dawn of Web 1.0 Marc Andreessen has been one of Silicon Valley's heavy hitters, and now he's behind some of the most innovative companies defining the web's future. He's on the board of Facebook, he invested in Twitter, earlier this year his fund invested in FourSquare, and now he's backing a new social search engine called RockMelt.

  • lions_gate_logo.jpg

    As Lionsgate continues its battle with Carl Icahn and its push to merge with MGM, it reported that it swung to a second quarter loss. The studio announced its earnings after the bell Tuesday — a net loss of 22 cents per share, down from a net profit of 26 cents per share in the year-earlier quarter, and 25 percent higher revenue of $456.3 million.

  • Mickey Mouse

    Today Disney CEO Bob Iger was joined by Mickey Mouse and Mayor Bloomberg to cut the ribbon on Disney's new flagship store.

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