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Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch looks down as he leaves the One Aldwych Hotel surrounded by his personal security team to speak with reporters after meeting with the family of murdered school girl Milly Dowler on July 15, 2011 in London, England.

    Rupert Murdoch has another headache on his hands- new allegations of hacking on top of shareholders advocating for his ousting. Murdoch kicked off the meeting with glowing comments about the state of the company, saying that the company's "in good shape to prosper." But it seems company hasn't yet put the hacking scandal behind it.

  • money_tree.jpg

    When the financial markets were zigzagging all over the place in the third quarter, venture capital investments were surprisingly robust.

  • What's Next for Hulu?

    Hulu could IPO or bring in another investor, like Time Warner, reports CNBC's Julia Boorstin.

  • Netflix

    On Thursday, Netflix announced it inked a deal for shows from the CW network. This new content, bolstering the streaming service's TV library, will draw a key younger demographic to Netflix while paying CW's parents, CBS and Warner Brothers, up to $1 billion dollars over ten years.

  • Apple's senior vice president of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue speaks about iCloud during introduction of the new iPhone 4s at the company’s headquarters October 4, 2011.

    Buy a movie once, watch it anywhere, on any Internet-connected device, through the cloud . That's the new business model making waves in Hollywood. Apple's in advanced negotiations with the movie studios to offer movies through its iCloud service and UltraViolet, from a consortium of media and tech companies, rolls out its first cloud-enabled DVDs this week. And Hollywood's hoping that these new options will grow digital movie sales to compensate for DVDs' decline.

  • Disney's Hopes for 'Angry Birds'

    A look at what the next "Angry Birds" could mean for Disney's bottomline, with CNBC's Julia Boorstin.

  • zynga_2_200.jpg

    Zynga's first-ever press event and slew of announcements weren't just a natural step in the company's ongoing growth — they were strategically timed to boost the company ahead of its initial public offering.

  • Netflix

    Netflix's stock had a roller coaster day following the company's reversal of a plan to re-brand its DVD-by-mail service as "Qwikster." First the stock soared on the news that the company is ditching the new Qwikster brand; but then...

  • Disney announced major news — a plan for CEO Bob Iger's reign over the "Magic Kingdom" to come to an end. Iger will step down as the company's CEO in March 2015, leaving the company in June 2016.

  • Steve Jobs

    Steve Jobs was so much more than a gadget guru — he challenged movie, music, video game gurus, and even the advertising to "think different." Jobs left a massive legacy across the media business, pushing for an overhaul of content distribution.

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