Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Comcast

    Comcast is bringing "TV Everywhere" mobile. The cable giant just announced a new Xfinity TV app, to allow digital TV subscribers to watch TV and program their DVRs, first on Apple's iPad and iPhone, with versions coming for Android devices later this year.

  • Marc Andreessen

    Since the dawn of Web 1.0 Marc Andreessen has been one of Silicon Valley's heavy hitters, and now he's behind some of the most innovative companies defining the web's future. He's on the board of Facebook, he invested in Twitter, earlier this year his fund invested in FourSquare, and now he's backing a new social search engine called RockMelt.

  • lions_gate_logo.jpg

    As Lionsgate continues its battle with Carl Icahn and its push to merge with MGM, it reported that it swung to a second quarter loss. The studio announced its earnings after the bell Tuesday — a net loss of 22 cents per share, down from a net profit of 26 cents per share in the year-earlier quarter, and 25 percent higher revenue of $456.3 million.

  • Mickey Mouse

    Today Disney CEO Bob Iger was joined by Mickey Mouse and Mayor Bloomberg to cut the ribbon on Disney's new flagship store.

  • CBS

    After being bashed for being too dependent on advertising, now CBS is benefiting from its share of the ad market — advertising is back, up 10 percent in the quarter.

  • Activision

    Activision Blizzard has proven that even if the video game industry as a whole is declining, consumers will still spend on big video game brands.

  • tv_remote_200.jpg

    Despite reporting earnings that were just in line with expectations, DirecTV shares have been trading off about 3 percent all day. Why? The satellite TV provider's earnings were in line with expectations, but the stock has gained 15 percent since August, without a pause.

  • watching_tv_200.jpg

    Earnings from giant Time Warner Cable and the smaller Cablevision told a very specific story about the cable business and about the state of the American consumer.

  • Rupert Murdoch

    Rupert Murdoch didn't come on News Corp's earnings call, which meant there were no dramatic statements about the future of subscription models or the importance of tablets like the iPad.

  • Facebook

    When Mark Zuckerberg took the stage at Facebook for a secret mobile announcement he didn't hesitate to squash the rumor that Facebook is building a phone. Zuckerberg simply said: NO. Instead, Facebook wants to make any phone a social environment, no matter what the platform.

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