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Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.


  • 2009's Box Office Winners Thursday, 31 Dec 2009 | 6:20 PM ET

    In 2009, the box office was remarkably robust, despite concerns about the pullback in consumer spending and competition with sophisticated home entertainment systems. People still like going to the movies — no matter what the economic environment.

  • Marvel Approves Disney Merger Thursday, 31 Dec 2009 | 3:27 PM ET

    The deal is done: Marvel shareholders have approved the company's acquisition by the Walt Disney Company.

  • Broadcast Battle Heats Up Wednesday, 30 Dec 2009 | 9:56 AM ET

    It's hard to turn on the TV or open a newspaper without catching sight of the fight Time Warner and News Corporation waging in the court of public opinion. If they can't strike a deal by the moment the ball starts to drop in Times Square on New Year's Eve, then you can forget about watching a Sugar Bowl game on Time Warner Cable on New Year's Day.


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