Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • tv_remote_200.jpg

    Despite reporting earnings that were just in line with expectations, DirecTV shares have been trading off about 3 percent all day. Why? The satellite TV provider's earnings were in line with expectations, but the stock has gained 15 percent since August, without a pause.

  • watching_tv_200.jpg

    Earnings from giant Time Warner Cable and the smaller Cablevision told a very specific story about the cable business and about the state of the American consumer.

  • Rupert Murdoch

    Rupert Murdoch didn't come on News Corp's earnings call, which meant there were no dramatic statements about the future of subscription models or the importance of tablets like the iPad.

  • Facebook

    When Mark Zuckerberg took the stage at Facebook for a secret mobile announcement he didn't hesitate to squash the rumor that Facebook is building a phone. Zuckerberg simply said: NO. Instead, Facebook wants to make any phone a social environment, no matter what the platform.

  • facebook_logo_new.jpg

    Of the 98 House races tracked by Facebook, the candidate with more "Fans" won 74 percent of the time.

  • The Time Warner building.

    Digital distribution was front and center in Time Warner's earnings conference call and CEO Jeff Bewkes detailed the various opportunities the company sees in making its content available everywhere.

  • Your Money Your Vote - A CNBC Special Report

    During these mid-term campaigns, candidates from both sides of the aisle have embraced Facebook and Twitter, following President Obama's huge success engaging with voters through social media during his campaign.

  • With Election Day looming the pace of political ad spending continues to accelerate — this is sure to be a record year. Political ad spending is on track to top $3 billion; not only is that far ahead of the $2.4 billion spent during the last mid-term elections, it even exceeds the $2.7 billion spent during the 2008 presidential campaigns.

  • Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios

    MGM's hundred-plus creditors have approved a pre-packaged bankruptcy plan, according to sources close to the situation.

  • no_fox_ad_200.jpg

    Cablevision's 3 million plus customers have not had access to Fox for the past 13 days as the companies have been locked in a standoff over retransmission fees.

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