Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Today FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski unveiled his proposal to regulate the Internet — a proposal the FCC will vote on December 21st.

  • A man with 3D glasses on.

    Gamemakers battle it out, consumers lose interest in 3-D technology and celebrities monetize their brands.

  • Oscar Awards

    The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences is departing from tradition: it picked Anne Hathaway and James Franco to host the 2011 Oscars.

  • Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

    The holiday movie season may be just half as long as the summer movie season, and it gets far less attention, but day for day it's just as important — it generates 20 percent of the annual box office. With a month left to go, the pressure's on for studios to boost their Q-4 numbers. And Wall Street's watching carefully for indications of which studios have momentum going into 2011.

  • There's no doubt, The Beatles have some serious staying power: their music, made forty years before the advent of the iPod, is a huge hit on iTunes. In their first week on the site The Beatles sold more than 450,000 albums and two million individual songs. This squashed concerns that the Fab Four were coming to iTunes too late — that people already owned or had pirated the music.

  • Groupon.com

    This holiday season Groupon's business is set to explode. As shoppers hunt for deals, social coupon sites offer a unique appeal: fifty percent plus discounts, limited quantity and limited time offers to create an air of exclusivity and incentive to buy now.

  • holiday_storefront.jpg

    Sure, there are a slew of black Friday TV commercials and you'll be inundated with glossy newspaper insert ads. But that's not all retailers are doing this year to get your attention — everyone from big box stores to boutiques is pulling out all the stops to deliver deals directly to consumers, to compel them to spend.

  • Netflix

    Today Netflix unveiled its long-anticipated streaming-only option—$7.99 a month for unlimited access to its library of 20,000 digital films. And the company that built its business on renting DVDs through the mail announced that it is primarily a streaming company.

  • family watching tv

    It makes sense: if people are dropping the lowest-tier cable service because it's too expensive, give them a cheaper option. That's what Time Warner Cable is experimenting with now: it'll test a less expensive TV package called "TV Essentials" targeting lower income consumers.

  • Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

    The book isn't quite tailored for the CNBC audience, is that it doesn't talk much about his varied businesses: running Def Jam or striking a $150 million deal with Live Nation. But if the book mirrors his music's success atop the Billboard charts, then Jay-Z stands to cash in.

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