Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

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    A federal appeals court said it will rehear a DVR patent dispute between TiVo and Dish Network and EchoStar.

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    European data protection officials have sent a letter to Facebook, saying that "it is unacceptable that the company fundamentally changed the default settings on its social-networking platform to the detriment of a user."

  • Cable TV

    Here at the National Cable Show it's not just cable carriers — content companies are also here, discussing new ways to grow viewers (and ad revenue) and rolling out new technology to keep subscribers hooked.

  • After a long string of disappointing earnings results from the studio drew harsh criticism from CEO Bob Iger, it seems the business is back on track. "Alice in Wonderland" was the second-biggest movie Disney spacer has ever released, with the seventh-biggest global box office of any film.

  • iger_robert_200.jpg

    After Disney reported its fiscal second quarter results I spoke exclusively with CEO Bob Iger, who is optimistic about what the company's results indicate about economic recovery.

  • cinderella_castle_AP.jpg

    Blockbuster "Alice in Wonderland" helped Disney beat expectations: every single division posted higher revenue, with revenue 6 percent higher than last year at $8.58 billion. Earnings per share of 48 cents beat analyst expectations, up 12 percent from last year's adjusted numbers.

  • The annual Cable Show starts this afternoon in Los Angeles and it could not come at a more momentous time for the industry.

  • Carl Icahn

    The ongoing battle between corporate raider Carl Icahn and Lionsgate has yielded yet another update. The movie studio issued a release saying that its shareholders rejected Icahn's offer to buy the company's common shares for $7 per share.

  • Twitter

    The Twittersphere erupted with protest when it appeared that users are following zero other people on Twitter and have 0 followers. Twitter quickly explained that it's fixing this glitch.

  • Iron Man 2

    The next three months are without a doubt Hollywood's most important season, generating an average 42 percent of annual box office. And this summer promises to generate the biggest U.S. box office on record — we could see over $4 billion dollars in tickets sold.

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