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Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

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    Time Warner is moving towards a new streamlined, content-focused model, and though it's suffering from the ad downturn, that core content business is thriving.

  • Cost Cutting Works for DreamWorks Animation Wednesday, 29 Jul 2009 | 9:57 AM ET
    earnings_central_badge.jpg

    DreamWorks Animation has the benefit of not being exposed to the weak ad market - but now the weak ad market is actually going to help the film studio cut costs and grow margins.

  • Viacom Hit Hard by Economic Downturn Tuesday, 28 Jul 2009 | 11:21 AM ET
    viacom_logo.jpg

    It was a tough quarter for Viacom, which struggled the economy, namely the weak ad market and lower video game sales of its "Rock Band" game. Plus, Sumner Redstone's media giant had fewer movie releases and tough comps with last year.

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