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Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology.

In 2013, Boorstin created and launched the CNBC Disruptor 50, an annual list highlighting the private companies transforming the economy and challenging companies in established industries. Additionally, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • cinderella_castle_AP.jpg

    Disney's fiscal second quarter earnings fell short of Wall Street expectations, on a slew of issues: some controllable; like a movie that bombed, and some uncontrollable; like, the Japanese earthquake.

  • Disney corporate headquarters in Burbank, California.

    Will Disney benefit from an advertising rebound and a return of consumer spending? That's what Wall Street will be looking for when the media giant reports its fiscal second quarter earnings after the market close.

  • Youtube

    Google's taking big steps to turn YouTube into a true entertainment destination, and to compete with Netflix, iTunes, Amazon and even Hulu. Along with the rest of those giants, Google wants to distribute content to consumers, so it can cash in on advertising and now rental revenue as well.

  • Concert

    The ticketing business took a turn for the worse last year — ticket sales down by double digits. Now Live Nation Entertainment and Groupon are teaming up to rev up the business with a whole new business model, launching a joint venture, called 'GrouponLive.'

  • Oprah Winfrey

    The Oprah Winfrey Network is only four months old — but apparently that's old enough for co-owners Discovery Communication and Oprah Winfrey to know that its management isn't working.

  • After three months of bidding, Warner Music was finally sold to Access Industries' Len Blavatnik for $3.3 billion. Blavatnik, a Russian billionaire with a taste for deal-making is paying a premium of about a third over WMG's average share price, which is certainly good for investors.

  • Electronic Arts Headquarters, Redwood City, California

    On strong growth of digital revenue, Electronic Arts reported strong earnings and beat expectations, sending its stock to a 52-week high. I sat down with CEO John Riccitiello in an exclusive interview about the company's strategy.

  • News Corp.'s headquarters in New York.

    Unlike many of the other media giants this quarter, News Corp did not surprise to the upside. Its earnings and revenue were lower than last year and fell short of Wall Street expectations.

  • The Time Warner building.

    This acquisition is significant for its home entertainment strategy, which is focused on driving more digital sales of movies, and speaks to the direction that all the studios will likely be moving.

  • In Comcast's first quarter since acquiring a majority stake in NBC Universal, CNBC's parent, the cable and media giant beat expectations. The cable division continues to draw more, higher-value subscribers, despite growing competition. NBC Universal reported far more granular numbers than it did when it was wholly owned by GE, and as expected, the cable networks thrived while the broadcast network continued to struggle.

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