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Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Entertainment Biz in a Slump Wednesday, 22 Jul 2009 | 2:15 PM ET
    Hollywood

    The booming box office is deceiving — movie studios are topping the $1 billion mark earlier this year than in years past and movies like Harry Potter continue to break opening-weekend records. But behind all those upbeat numbers, the industry is struggling.

  • Michael Jackson's Next Big Sale Tuesday, 21 Jul 2009 | 6:50 AM ET

    AEG Live is looking to recoup the $30 million-plus it spent producing Michael Jackson's unrealized concert tour, and now it's selling off the rights to the rehearsal footage. Sources tell me that Sony Pictures Entertainment has bid $50 million to acquire the distribution rights.

  • Tim Armstrong has been CEO of AOL for more than 100 days now and he's starting to talk about his plans to transform the struggling division of Time Warner. (Last week I reported on his four main areas of focus).

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