Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • iger_robert_200.jpg

    Disney CEO Bob Iger had tons to say about the need to innovate when I spoke to him after the company's fiscal fourth quarter earnings. Under pressure from piracy and a mature DVD market Disney is throwing out the old rules and looking for new ways to grow revenue.

  • discovery_channel_200.jpg

    International growth helped Discovery Communications earnings grow 46 percent, in line with expectations, while revenue grew seven percent.

  • I sat down with Disney CEO Bob Iger for an exclusive interview after the company's fiscal first quarter earnings call.

  • Disney

    The results are really a media network's story, a sign of the improving health of the ad market and the fact that subscription fees continue to grow

  • Google presents buzz as an addition to Gmail that enables private sharing with your friends (like Facebook) or public sharing with everyone (like Twitter).

  • The morning after the big game the New Orleans Saints weren't the only big winners: advertisers cashed in on the biggest audience for any program and TV history. So who won?

  • The Super Bowl on CBS isn't just about TV. Advertisers who hell out millions for a 30-second spot are working hard to maximize their return on investment, so they're going online.

  • Despite the pullback in the adverting dollars and marketer’s shift from traditional media to the Internet, companies are still clamoring to shell out millions for a 30-second Super Bowl spot.

  • The Super Bowl isn't just the biggest game of the year; it's the biggest annual forum for advertisers.

  • The latest numbers, out today from Comscore reveal that the number of videos Hulu streamed quadrupled from December 2008 to December 2009. And Hulu's unique visitors grew to over 44 million, up from just 24.5 million a year earlier.

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