Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Beach

    Americans are sick of "staycations": this summer they're leaving the  home and willing to spend for proper vacations. And travel stocks — hotels, cruise lines, and airlines — are reaping the benefits.

  • News Corp.'s headquarters in New York.

    News Corp is seriously evaluating a move that would transform the digital news business. Sources close to the company tell me that CEO Rupert Murdoch is considering creating a new purely digital news venture and would be available through subscription on devices like the iPad.

  • The message from media and tech companies is clear: advertising is back in a big way. This week both Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of WPP and Disney CEO Bob Iger told CNBC that the ad market has improved from last year and continues to improve. We've seen that demonstrated in results from a diverse group of industry players, from tech giants to newspapers.

  • iger_robert_200.jpg

    I just broke the news that Disney has staked a serious claim in social gaming — it just finalized its acquisition of Playdom for $563.2 million. Disney could pay the social gaming company an additional $200 million if Playdom hits certain performance metrics over the next few years.

  • movie_no_tax_breaks.jpg

    The Milken Institute has released a report that finds that the flight of film and TV production from California has cost the state more than 36,000 jobs since 1997. That adds up to $2.4 billion in wages and $4.2 billion in total economic output lost in the past 13 years.

  • Netflix

    The company's earnings may have grown profit 34 percent from a year ago, beating analyst expectations. But revenue fell just short of analyst forecasts and the company's average revenue per user declined 8 percent from the year-ago quarter.

  • facebook.jpg

    As Facebook nears its 500 millionth user, the popular social network has made progress fighting a lawsuit filed by a web designer, Paul Ceglia, claiming he owns an 84 percent stake in the company.

  • Magazines

    A key sign of relief for the struggling magazine industry: monthly ad sales for August magazines jumped 10 percent. Media Industry Newsletter just reported this jump in ad pages at monthly magazines — the first month of 10 percent year-over-year growth in nearly six years.

  • live_nation_logo.jpg

    The pullback in consumer spending has slammed the concert business, and though Live Nation Entertainment is experimenting with new ticket-pricing models, that's not enough to assuage concerned investors' fears.

  • tv.jpg

    Cable companies and content providers have repeatedly battled over fees, with channels getting temporarily yanked from the air during negotiations. Today 31 video distributors are partnering to form the "American Television Alliance," to address the rules governing broadcast signals and the threat of blackouts. The group says it aims to "protect consumers in today's changing TV environment" — to keep their favorite shows from being collateral damage of negotiations, as when Disney pulled ABC off Cablevision's air right before the Oscars.

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