Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.


  • A line of people waiting to play Assassin's Creed from Unisoft.

    You'd never guess from game developers' E3 presentations that game software sales dropped 7 percent year-to-date through April. This is game companies once-a-year opportunity to roll out their schedule and get fans excited, appealing directly to the bloggers and fan sites that chronicle every upcoming game.

  • Xbox 360

    Video game makers love their core audience — men 18 to 40 who obsessively follow, buy, and play violent action games — but it's a finite one. Now game makers are looking much broader, to women and kids. The consoles are already in millions of Americans living rooms: now software makers just need to convince other members of gamers' families to spend on game software.

  • After a long, drawn-out debate, the Commodities Futures Trading Association on Monday approved the first box office futures products.

  • Playing Guitar Hero

    As E3 kicks off this week I spoke to Bobby Kotick, CEO of the largest video game maker Activision Blizzard for his insight into the future of the industry.

  • tv_advertising.jpg

    The fact that broadcast networks (and NBC in particular) are investing heavily in expensive content is appealing to advertisers. The networks have introduced 38 new shows, and 36 of those are scripted.

  • The match ball for the opening World Cup fixture between South Africa and Mexico.

    ESPN 3D's launch Friday with World Cup coverage marks the beginning of a whole new 3D advertising business. The channel announced it's launching with 3D commercials from Disney/Pixar's Toy Story 3, (corporate synergy), plus Sony and Gillette.

  • Disney World of Color

    The 400 amusement parks in the U.S. generate some $12 billion in annual revenue from more than 300 million annual visitors. Last year North American parks saw a one percent decline in attendance, but discounting prevented attendance from falling off further.

  • Sources tell me that ABC has finished its final upfront ad deals, and has secured 8 percent to 9 percent ad rates over last year. I don't have any details on the percentage volume increases ABC secured, but Disney's network has certainly sold closer to 80 percent of its inventory than the 65 or 70 percent the networks sold on average last year.

  • Big news from Take Two Interactive—it's sold five million copies of "Red Dead Redemption" since its May 18 debut. This blows away all projections: analysts expected the company to sell some three million copies in the entire quarter and up to five million copies for the rest of the fiscal year.

  • Gavel

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a ruling against TiVo, over its rights to patent technology in the middle of a legal battle with Dish Network and EchoStar.

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