Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.


  • Chris Kelly, candidate for California Attorney General.

    Chris Kelly, candidate for California Attorney General, is finding himself in the middle of Facebook's privacy controversy.

  • Facebook

    In a Washington Post Op/Ed CEO Monday Mark Zuckerberg buried the lead: "In the coming weeks we will add privacy controls that are much simpler to use. We will also give you an easy way to turn off all third-party services. We are working hard to make these changes available as soon as possible. We hope you'll be pleased with the result of our work, and as always, we'll be eager to get your feedback."

  • Shrek Forever After

    The film brought in $71 million, dominating the U.S. box office as the fourth highest animated movie opening ever. But this fell short of projections, and the number of tickets sold was down 59 percent from the prior Shrek's debut weekend.

  • Carl Icahn

    Today he announced he's extended his $7 a share tender offer for Lionsgate—for the third time. Instead of expiring this evening, his tender offer will now expire at 8 pm on June 1. This comes just days after Lionsgate and Icahn sat down for talks on alternative options, talks that don't seem to have gone anywhere.

  • Shrek Forever After

    Today DreamWorks' Animation's "Shrek Forever After" will open in over 4,300 theaters — more than half of them in 3-D. This, the fourth and last movie in the franchise, will be the green ogre's first venture into 3-D, and it should be a quite profitable one.

  • A sign is displayed outside of the Google headquarters in Mountain View, California.

    Google TV aims to eliminate the line between your computer and your television. It's designed to allow you to surf a range of websites and access online video from your couch.

  • Hollywood sign

    Hollywood is in the spotlight in Washington D.C.: today the CFTC hosted a hearing on controversial box office futures. Should people be able to trade expectations of box office performance just like they trade pork bellies or orange juice futures? The CFTC already approved two futures exchanges designed to trade box office derivatives; next month it faces deadlines to approve the proposed contracts.

  • Grand Theft Auto IV

    Video game sales may have plummeted 26 percent in April, but now there's hope that a new game will get the industry moving. "Red Dead Redemption" goes on sale today, and based on rave reviews and some anecdotal reports of huge lines outside Game Stop stores, this game could be a blockbuster.

  • Carl Icahn

    This is just the latest in the ongoing battle between the movie studio and Carl Icahn, who's attempting to take the company over for $7 a share. After facing a major setback last week Icahn isn't giving up without a fight.

  • Youtube celebrates 5 years.

    Google bought the website for $1.65 billion at the end of 2006 and now its growth seems unstoppable: it doubled its number of daily views from 1 billion in October.

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