CNBC Television | Europe

Katrina Bishop

News Editor, CNBC

Katrina Bishop is the news editor of CNBC EMEA. She previously worked on CNBC.com, as a business producer at Sky News and a copy editor at Dow Jones Newswires.

Follow Katrina on Twitter @KatrinaBishop and Google+ Katrina Bishop

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Marketing.Media.Money

  • What are the key themes in 2016 for the advertising space? App indexing? Digital assistants? Virtual reality? CNBC talks to two special guests about their opinion.

  • Keith Weed, chief marketing and communications officer at Unilever, talks to CNBC about ad-blocking and why its a "big challenge" for the industry.

  • CNBC talks to Keith Weed, chief marketing and communications officer at Unilever, and asks him about the changing landscape in how consumers digest content and its impact on advertising.

One Second in... F1 Racing

  • F1 to your car

    CNBC looks at how the computer systems in F1 cars have made their way into regular vehicles.

  • Leadership: Jean Todt

    FIA President Jean Todt discusses his start with the Ferarri team and the current problems facing F1.

  • Are F1 engines too quiet?

    F1 experts discuss whether the quieter engine sounds are making the sport less attractive.

Worldwide Exchange

  • Data shows rate hike by end of year: Pro

    The market is under-pricing the probability of an increase in interest rates, says Jim Cahn, Wealth Enhancement Group sharing his outlook on the markets. Also Cahn explains why energy prices have room to go a little higher.

  • Must Read: Keep America strong

    The "Worldwide Exchange" crew discusses some of the morning's top attention-grabbing headlines, including a story in the Washington Post titled "America is still great - but needs to stay strong," and a Financial Times piece titled, "Put tired James Bond out of his misery."

  • Brexit plan B

    Fred Kempe, Atlantic Council, discusses the likelihood of the United Kingdom leaving the European Union and security concerns if Britain does leave.