Contracts Labor Unions

  • UAW_logo_new.jpg

    With the UAW and Ford announcing they have agreed on a plan to re-work funding of union's Voluntary Employee Beneficiary Association, it is an important step not only for Ford, but GM and Chrysler as well.

  • American Flag

    It may seem like the country that used to make everything is on the brink of making nothing.

  • General Motors

    For GM and Chrysler, this is when the good stuff will start happening. After a month of seeing relatively little from GM and Chrysler about how they plan to restructure their operations, we could be on the verge of a couple busy months.

  • obama-briefs.jpg

    First, this headline: Kimberly-Clark says people are not only trading down in this economy, they're actually buying less toilet paper. Let me think this one through...

  • President Barack Obama

    Now that he's taken the oath of office a second time, watched the Jesse White Tumblers in the inaugural parade, and danced at several balls celebrating his inauguration, President Obama faces some tough choices with the auto industry. What should he do? What would you do if you were sitting in the oval office?

  • The Bachelor

    Reality TV's biggest off-air conflict just resolved with a lot more civility than anything you'll see on reality TV. Two class action suits demanding more than $4 million in overtime violations just settled.

  • Deal, Handshake

    Like a Clint Eastwood spaghetti western, the alliance between Chrysler and Fiat is an intriguing piece of work that leaves you scratching your head.

  • Jerry Bowyer

    Remember the wall to wall coverage given to the dangers of outsourcing in the run up to the 2004 presidential election? It was the shark attack story of that summer. Some of us argued that the threat was exaggerated. It turns out that the supply side of outsourcing was as over estimated as the demand side.

  • Screen Actors Guild

    With the Screen Actors Guild leadership pushing for its members to vote to authorize a strike, Hollywood has been buzzing about how bad another work stoppage would be for the industry at this already precarious economic time.

  • Ron Gettlefinger

    The announcement by UAW President Ron Gettlefinger that his union may make material changes to its contract to help the Big 3 is a big deal.

  • capitol_building_6.jpg

    The announcement by UAW President Ron Gettlefinger that his union may make material changes to its contract to help the Big 3 is a big deal.

  • Chrysler Vice Chairman Jim Press reiterated the need for government aid to help support the auto industry as he travels to hearings in Washington, D.C.

  • At his news conference this morning, where he introduced New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson as Commerce-secretary designate, President-elect Obama refused to play his hand on the Detroit/GM bailout story. That tells me he’s aware that the country is getting fed up with the thought of bailout nation.

  • volvo_grill_AP.jpg

    Call this the start of the Big 3 becoming the smaller 3. Starting tomorrow and playing out over the course of the next week Detroit's auto makers will be telling Congress how they plan to get back in the black.

  • Despite its overall troubles, General Motors appears to have enough money in its pension fund to last a decade or more, the New York Times reports.

  • Screen Actors Guild

    The idea of a guild striking in this economic environment seems odd, to say the least. Doesn't everyone have more to lose? In Hollywood, after months of a standoff, an actors' strike seems more possible than ever.

  • UAW_logo_new.jpg

    Have you been listening to political leaders talk about what it will take for the Detroit 3 and the UAW to get Washington to sign off on a bailout for the industry? If so, you've heard several key words and phrases used to describe what the auto makers need to do.

  • GM logo, General Motors logo

    General Motors will extend its holiday shutdown or make other production cuts at five factories at as it deals with a continued U.S. auto sales slump and fights to stay solvent.

  • Andrew Busch

    Events move much faster than individual corporations, unions, and governments can act. However, they all are finding ways to adjust. While I expect the learning curve to remain steep, the knowledge is getting processed and acted upon

  • Screen Actors Guild

    With the financial markets in crisis it's easy to forget that the Screen Actors guild has been working without a contract since their deal with the AMPTP, the producers association, expired this summer.