Law Lawsuits

  • The owners of the World Trade Center cannot demand billions of dollars more in insurance money for the Sept. 11 attacks, a federal judge decided Thursday.

  • Paolo Pellegrini's combative testimony was not what the S.E.C was looking for.

    The SEC had hoped to use testimony from Paolo Pellegrini to support its case against Fabrice Tourre, charged with defrauding investors, but Pellegrini testified the opposite.

  • The EU may deliver a blow to credit-card companies if a proposal to cap lucrative credit-card transaction fees is approved.

  • Former AIG CEO Greenberg sues Spitzer

    Netflix has more than 36 million streaming customers, and former AIG CEO Hank Greenberg has filed suit against Eliot Spitzer. CNBC's Seema Mody has all the details.

  • Apple Says It Did Nothing Wrong

    The tech giant is pushing back against a ruling it violated antitrust laws, reports CNBC's Jon Fortt.

  • How the App Store Has Changed the World

    Lance Ulanoff, Mashable, and Brian Heater, Engadget, discuss a judge's ruling that Apple violated antitrust laws. They also look at the impact on competition in software applications.

  • Apple Loses E-Book Case

    The ruling hits Apple's business practices, but will have limited impact on its stock, reports CNBC's Jon Fortt.

  • Treasury Lawsuit Could Land In Supreme Court: Hedge Fund Lawyer

    The law requires FHFA to be the conservator for Fannie & Freddie, and the lawsuit filed Sunday could very well end up in the Supreme Court, says Matthew McGill, partner in the law firm taking up the case.

  • Faber Report: Perry Capital Sues Treasury Dept.

    CNBC's David Faber reports Perry Capital wants to stop the Treasury from enforcing the "Third Amendment" or the way the department deals with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

  • Yoga pants on sale at the Lululemon retail store in New York.

    Lululemon has been hit with a U.S. lawsuit accusing it of defrauding shareholders by hiding defects in sheer yoga pants, and concealing talks that led to the departure of its CEO.

  • Monster Energy Drinks Faces Suits

    Monster Beverage is fighting two wrongful death suits. The company's paid medical consultant, Dr. Bob Arnot, provides its perspective.

  • Suing Monster Beverage Corp.

    A second wrongful death suit was filed against Monster Beverage. Kevin Goldberg of Goldberg Finnegan & Mester is suing the company for the deaths of a 14-year-old girl in Maryland and a 19-year-old man in California.

  • Corzine Civil Suit?

    The CFTC is looking to sue Jon Corzine for the collape of MF Global and the firm's misuse of customer funds, reports CNBC's Kayla Tausche.

  • Get Out of Jail Card for Skilling?

    Enron whistleblower Sherron Watkins, provides her perspective on the possibility that former Enron CEO could receive a reduced sentence for his role in one of the most notorious corporate crimes in U.S. history.

  • SEC: 'Admit When You're Wrong!'

    Harvey Pitt, former SEC chairman, discusses a change in procedures at the SEC and whether it will result in more cases going to trial.

  • KPMG Ex-Partner Speaks Out

    Scott London is pleading guilty to insider trading and spoke to CNBC's Jane Wells about why he did what he did. London was at KPMG for 30 years.

  • Bank of America paid cash bonuses to bank staffers to push homeowners into foreclosure, according to affidavits filed last week in a Massachusetts lawsuit.

  • The Supreme Court says deals between pharmaceutical companies and their generic drug competitors can sometimes be illegal.

  • Headlines of the Week

    A look back at this week's top news stories, with "Power Lunch" panel. First up, CNBC's Eamon Javers has the latest details on information leaker, Edward Snowden. Kate Kelly reports SAC Capital investors pulled billion of dollars from the hedge fund and now the Justice Department is widening its investigation. And score one for the interns, as lawsuits surface over pay at Conde Nast, reports CNBC's Kayla Tausche.

  • Apple Executive Takes the Stand

    The highest-ranking Apple executive to testify will take the stand Thursday at the e-books price-fixing trial, reports CNBC's Jon Fortt.