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Law Lawsuits

  • Closing arguments in Macy's vs. JC Penney case

    CNBC's Courtney Reagan has the latest details on the court battle over Martha Stewart products.

  • Game changing ruling for EA

    U.S Federal courts have appealed Electronic Arts in favor of ex-NCAA basketball and football players. Len Elmore, lawyer and former NCAA player, joins to discuss the implications and the future of EA.

  • Aggarwal charged in insider trading scheme

    Conspiracy charges have been filed against former equity analyst Sandeep Aggarwal for allegedly providing information about negotiations between Yahoo and Microsoft to SAC's Richard Lee, reports CNBC's Scott Cohn.

  • JPM to pay $450M in energy market case

    Jon Wellinghoff, FERC chairman discusses JPMorgan's settlement of energy market manipulation of the power market in California and Michigan, with CNBC' Kate Kelly.

  • NJ's 'Real Housewives' stars indicted

    The Giudices, one of the families in the "Real Housewives of New Jersey," are accused of mail and wire, bank and bankruptcy fraud, in addition to making false statements on loan applications, according to the Justice Department. NBC's Andrea Day reports.

  • Closing arguments begin in Tourre case

    CNBC's Mary Thompson has the latest details in the securities fraud trial of former Goldman Sachs trader Fabrice Tourre.

  • JPM to pay $450 million

    JPMorgan has agreed to pay $410 million to settle allegations of power market manipulation in California and the Midwest, reports CNBC's Kate Kelly.

  • Defense rests in 'Fabulous Fab' trial

    The defense team for former Goldman Sachs trader Fabrice Tourre accused of defrauding investors in a mortgage deal six years ago rested yesterday without calling any witnesses, reports CNBC's Scott Cohn with the latest details.

  • Will Bernanke take the stand?

    Hon. Richard Holwell, former Federal judge, explains why it's "a little unusual" for the Fed's chairman to be deposed in a suit involving the 2008 bailout of AIG.

  • Toyota acceleration case begins

    The first Toyota unintended acceleration lawsuit heads to court today. KNBC's Jacob Rascon reports the family alleges the defect caused a fatal crash.

  • vitaminWater.jpg

    A judge has recommended that Coca-Cola face a class-action lawsuit accusing it of misleading consumers by overstating the health benefits of its Vitaminwater drink.

  • The owners of the World Trade Center cannot demand billions of dollars more in insurance money for the Sept. 11 attacks, a federal judge decided Thursday.

  • Paolo Pellegrini's combative testimony was not what the S.E.C was looking for.

    The SEC had hoped to use testimony from Paolo Pellegrini to support its case against Fabrice Tourre, charged with defrauding investors, but Pellegrini testified the opposite.

  • The EU may deliver a blow to credit-card companies if a proposal to cap lucrative credit-card transaction fees is approved.

  • Former AIG CEO Greenberg sues Spitzer

    Netflix has more than 36 million streaming customers, and former AIG CEO Hank Greenberg has filed suit against Eliot Spitzer. CNBC's Seema Mody has all the details.

  • Apple Says It Did Nothing Wrong

    The tech giant is pushing back against a ruling it violated antitrust laws, reports CNBC's Jon Fortt.

  • How the App Store Has Changed the World

    Lance Ulanoff, Mashable, and Brian Heater, Engadget, discuss a judge's ruling that Apple violated antitrust laws. They also look at the impact on competition in software applications.

  • Apple Loses E-Book Case

    The ruling hits Apple's business practices, but will have limited impact on its stock, reports CNBC's Jon Fortt.

  • Treasury Lawsuit Could Land In Supreme Court: Hedge Fund Lawyer

    The law requires FHFA to be the conservator for Fannie & Freddie, and the lawsuit filed Sunday could very well end up in the Supreme Court, says Matthew McGill, partner in the law firm taking up the case.

  • Faber Report: Perry Capital Sues Treasury Dept.

    CNBC's David Faber reports Perry Capital wants to stop the Treasury from enforcing the "Third Amendment" or the way the department deals with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.