Law Lawsuits

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    Bradley Birkenfeld once lived the high life as secret Swiss banker at UBS in Geneva. Then he delivered some of the world’s best-kept secrets to the US government, expecting a great reward. And now he sits in federal prison in Pennsylvania.

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    Cheryl Eckard became the largest individual whistleblower award recipient ever, hauling in a $96 million bounty as her reward for providing information to the government about manufacturing problems at GlaxoSmithKline.

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    Have you ever been tempted to blow the whistle on something suspicious you've witnesses in the workplace? Take our poll and share your opinion.

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    The U.S. Bureau of Prisons has denied a request by former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling for a temporary release from prison to attend his son's funeral, CNBC has learned. No reason was given for the denial.

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    Forget what you think you know about lone whistleblowers taking on giant corporations all by themselves. These days, there's a cottage industry to support—and profit from—whistleblowing.

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    When President Barack Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform act into law last summer, very few in the financial industry knew that the bill included a massive change in the way whistleblowing law works in this country.

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    That promise of cash is providing a new incentive for employees to reveal wrongdoing in their companies. What would you do?

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    Wall Street is suddenly paying attention to the culture of whistleblowing, because the new Dodd-Frank financial reform law, for the first time, extends whistleblower provisions to Wall Street, meaning employees who expose fraud and wrongdoing stand to collect between 10 and 30 percent of the amount recovered by the government.

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    Taking a look at the biggest fraud cases of all time, and you're left with just one question: What's wrong with the pharmaceutical industry?

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    Taco Bell is launching an advertising campaign Friday to fight back against a lawsuit charging its taco filling isn't beef.

  • White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel

    An Illinois Appeals Court ruled Monday that former White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel's name can't appear on the ballot for Chicago mayor because he didn't live in the city in the year before the election.

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    Since the government took over Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, taxpayers have spent more than $160 million defending the mortgage finance companies and their former top executives in civil lawsuits accusing them of fraud. The New York Times reports.

  • Call of Duty Black Ops

    The war of words between Activision-Blizzard and Electronic Arts has moved to a new plateau. Activision has added the rival publisher to its $400 countersuit against the creators of the “Call of Duty” franchise.

  • Remington Model 700.

    The manufacturer of the most popular hunting rifle in the world has been aware of potential safety problems with the gun since before it went on the market—60 years ago.  Newly uncovered documents, including memos and drawings by the gun’s inventor, show company officials discussing the potential problem, as well as whether a design change is worth “the high expenditure required to make the conversion.”

  • US public pensions face a shortfall of $2,500 billion that will force state and local governments to sell assets and make deep cuts to services, according to the former chairman of New Jersey’s pension fund, reports the Financial Times.

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    ACA Financial Guaranty Corporation is suing Goldman Sachs over the deal that gave rise to fraud charges from the Securities and Exchange Commission last year.

  • The judge in the upcoming criminal trial of accused Ponzi schemer Allen Stanford has set a hearing for next Thursday on Stanford's motion to delay the trial, which is scheduled to begin January 24.

  • Julian Assange

    Julian Assange has signed book deals worth more than £1 million ($1.5 million) in the US and UK, to allow the WikiLeaks founder to cover his legal fees and maintain the whistleblowing site, reports the Financial Times.

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    MBIA wins the right to prove fraud case by statistical sampling.