Law Legislation

  • Two former officers at a company that supplies body armor to the U.S. Army face charges they inflated the company's stock price and made nearly $200 million in the process.

  • A U.S. securities regulator Tuesday warned investors to be wary of scams touting huge potential profits from energy-related stocks, when the onlypeople likely to make money are those running the schemes.

  • The European Commission on Monday extended the deadline for its inquiry into Google's proposed purchase of rival DoubleClick to Nov. 13 from Oct. 26.

  • An assistant to hedge fund manager Seth Tobias, who died suddenly last month at age 44, told CNBC he has evidence that Tobias was murdered.

  • House Democrats on Wednesday pushed through legislation to end a program that turns over smaller-scale tax deadbeat cases to private collection agencies.

  • On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court is hearing an case that some say may alter the landscape of investing. The outcome potentially could strengthen shareholder confidence -- or stifle investment markets.

  • Steven G. Schulman was charged in Los Angeles as part of a seven-year investigation into allegations that kickbacks were paid to people who agreed to be plaintiffs in class-action suits.

  • On Oct. 9, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case that some say may open the flood gates to a tidal wave of investor lawsuits. Legal experts joined CNBC to debate both sides of the issue.

  • U.S. chipmaker Intel has asked for more time to respond to antitrust charges filed by the European Commission, an official at the European Union's executive arm said on Monday.

  • The Recording Industry Association of America won a big victory--the first of 26,000 music file sharing copyright infringement suits settled in their favor. The amount of the settlement: $222,000. Considering that 10,000 of the suits have settled for less than $5,000 this is a good thing.

  • The U.S. House of Representatives Thursday overwhelmingly approved legislation providing tax relief to homeowners facing a foreclosure.

  • A U.S. jury has handed a victory to the music recording industry, which had claimed a Minnesota woman infringed song copyrights by using online media to illegally download and distribute music, according to court documents.

  • A bankruptcy judge on Wednesday gave Interstate Bakeries and its largest union 30 more days to either work out their differences or develop plans for the company's future, including a possible sale.

  • Jordan Belfort

    Jordan Belfort is the biggest Wall Street crook you've never heard of. He was the king of funny business (not in the ha-ha way) during the bull market of the '90s, nicknamed "The Wolf of Wall Street." I profile Belfort on "Business Nation" this month, and you'll learn how he created a brokerage called Stratton Oakmont which functioned like a cult.

  • European aerospace group EADS and its shareholders were engulfed in a deepening controversy on Wednesday as the prosecutor's office confirmed it had received a report on insider share trading from French regulators.

  • A federal judge in California certified a class action lawsuit against Target brought by plaintiffs claiming the discount retailer's Web site is inaccessible to the blind, according to court documents.

  • New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg was the victim of identity theft, according to the New York County District Attorney's office.

  • Oscar Wyatt

    Texas oilman Oscar Wyatt pleaded guilty Monday to conspiracy to commit wire fraud, one of five counts against him for his role in the U.N. oil-for-food scandal.

  • The Supreme Court Monday rejected a tobacco industry appeal on two issues in a Florida class-action case that has already resulted in a $145 billion punitive award against the cigarette makers being overturned.

  • The European Commission said on Monday it had decided to open formal anti-trust proceedings against Qualcomm over the U.S. company's patent licensing rates for third-generation mobile telephones.